Who else has a dct that is never going back to a traditional clutch?

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I have owned over 12 different bikes over the years and I don't see myself ever going back to tradition clutch for my main bike. I may get a second bike specifically to practice stunting on but I don't think I will ever get a non auto bike for my main squeeze. I just love the convenience of this soo much!
 

670cc

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For wanting an automatic only, sticking with DCT kind of limits brand and bike choices for now. Don't overlook CVT. It's simple mechanical technology that works quite well.
 
D

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I'm sure there is a Goldwing in your future :)
I also want the Bad Drivers Deterrent (BDD) option:

 
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dduelin

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If I had only only bike I’m not sure I’d want a DCT. I often thought about that when I had one of each. I do enjoy shifting a manual and when I rode ride the manual bike after two or three weeks off of it I noticed I was already losing the finesse edge. DCT on the NC700X is awesome however. Honda tech at its best.
 

670cc

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I was curious about the current lineup of DCT models and what choices are available (not including discontinued models). It looks like if you were to insist on buying an automatic DCT motorcycle, there are currently only three engine/transmission combos in the whole world to chose from: the GL1800, models using the NC750 engine, and the Africa Twin. Am I missing any? The VFR, CTX, and NM4 models appear to be discontinued from the US market.

Automatic transmissions would seem to be attractive to new riders but it is odd that the Honda DCT is not available in a motorcycle that weighs under 500 pounds. If they want to continue to pursue the auto tranny market, I‘d like to think maybe Honda has a simplified automatic transmission design in developement that will be available as an option on smaller models, perhaps in the 200-600cc range.

Motorcycle manufacturers other than Honda don’t seem interested in selling automatic transmission models, although there are a few choices. Can-Am is using a CVT in their Ryker three wheel machine. You could argue that electric motorcycles are automatics.
 
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melensdad

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Pretty sure I was reading somewhere that Honda is developing a simplified auto shifter that would be less expensive and smaller so it could be adapted to smaller displacement bikes.

I do think that it’s attractive to newbie riders, but it’s not necessarily a newbie transmission. I’ve gotten to the point that I see no reason to ever go back to a manual for my main bike. Doesn’t mean I wouldn’t buy another clutch machine but my daily ride would be an auto shift. I’m drawn to the Royal Enfield bikes, but just for fun. I’m drawn to the Moto Guzzi V85 TT, which is a serious bike but lack of dealers/reliability...
 

Fuzzy

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I was curious about the current lineup of DCT models and what choices are available (not including discontinued models). It looks like if you were to insist on buying an automatic DCT motorcycle, there are currently only three engine/transmission combos in the whole world to chose from: the GL1800, models using the NC750 engine, and the Africa Twin. Am I missing any? The VFR, CTX, and NM4 models appear to be discontinued from the US market.

Automatic transmissions would seem to be attractive to new riders but it is odd that the Honda DCT is not available in a motorcycle that weighs under 500 pounds. If they want to continue to pursue the auto tranny market, I‘d like to think maybe Honda has a simplified automatic transmission design in developement that will be available as an option on smaller models, perhaps in the 200-600cc range.

Motorcycle manufacturers other than Honda don’t seem interested in selling automatic transmission models, although there are a few choices. Can-Am is using a CVT in their Ryker three wheel machine. You could argue that electric motorcycles are automatics.
They put them in side by sides.
 

Fuzzy

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I like my Versys 300x. If available with a dct would have bought it that way. Wanted a bike lighter than my NC700 and no DCT options.

I do think there will be more coming as it has gained acceptance and competitors are probably looking at options to compete.
 

DirtFlier

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During these pandemic times, I've been watching lots of YouTube video on mostly fix-it subjects but the other morning, I found an NC700X video where they compared the acceleration of the DCT bike against one with manual transmission. Don't know the year it was made but obviously pre-750 engine.

The DCT bike always out accelerated the bike with full manual trans, either using "S" or shifting via upshift paddle. From what good pals have told me, the manual model is tough to accelerate quickly because you bump into the rev limiter so quickly which is not a problem with DCT. :)
 

670cc

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During these pandemic times, I've been watching lots of YouTube video on mostly fix-it subjects but the other morning, I found an NC700X video where they compared the acceleration of the DCT bike against one with manual transmission. Don't know the year it was made but obviously pre-750 engine.

The DCT bike always out accelerated the bike with full manual trans, either using "S" or shifting via upshift paddle. From what good pals have told me, the manual model is tough to accelerate quickly because you bump into the rev limiter so quickly which is not a problem with DCT. :)
Haha! :D That reminded me of the video comparing manual NC700X to DCT, and the DCT won a race. However, a very close look at the rear view of the two bikes in the race showed that they both had parking brakes. Hey, wait a minute! Those are both DCT! In the fine print it was then explained that they were both DCT bikes but one of the DCT bikes was ridden with a slight throttle delay at the shift pounts, simulating shifting a manual, and thus it was proven that the “real” DCT won. Makes for a real, honest comparison, don’t you think? What a joke. Actually I wouldn’t give a hoot which version is faster in a drag race.

Here was the text associated with the video, with my emphasis on the “cheat”. I’ll bet few people actually read this fine print.:
”The Honda nc700x is famous for economy and practicality, not for acceleration. But how slow is it really, with a heavy driver on board. In this test I wanted to compare automatic and a manual clutch bike, which I had to simulate by throttling between each shift on my dct version. This test indicates that the dual transmission doesn't loose power during shifting. and that it would be hard for the clutch version to keep up. Let's see the result in seconds. The time reveals that each clutching or throttling cost me about half a second. Even with manual shifting the dct is still one second faster, indicating that it's the dual clutch technology that is important, not the automation itself. So it shouldn't be any surprise that more than one third of the nc700 customers choose the dct version.”

 
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