crash bars

easterncoyote

New Member
Joined
May 20, 2017
Messages
66
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
Guelph Ontario Canada
Yikes. Didn’t mean to set you off. Sorry about that. Just telling my experience.

I guess we can say you jumped to conclusions because I was pulling up in the parking spot to check for traffic, but had my wheel turned in preparation to pull out. So obviously there’s no braking technique here, just a touch of the brakes and you come to a stop. But as we all know, when the wheel is turned and you come to a stop, the bike wants to go over. And given that I am a very small guy, 5’6” with 29” inseem, I just couldn’t keep it up. Had I had another 2 inches or so, it wouldn’t have been a problem. Because I was so close to saving it.

And I was aggravated because had I seen that happen to someone, I would have hurried over to check on them and help, regardless of the size of the bike. I guess it’s just not in everyone’s nature to care for their fellow man. I don’t feel entitled like they SHOUD have helped, but like PapaC said, just the apathetic looks I got. I picked it up, restarted and got going again no problem. I guess i was implying it was a principle thing. I apologize, I should have made that more clear.

Again, not wanting to set you off, just telling my experience and hoping someone can get something out of it. I know I am appreciative of anyone on the forum who tells their experiences because I’m always looking to learn something from it. When it comes to motorcycles, I never want to get complacent.
I admire your gracious response to the convict’s comments. He is the one who should apologize. I dropped my bike 2 weeks ago maneuvering out of my parking garage. First time ever. It happens so quickly. I wish I had known about the turned wheel, hitting the brake thing. I have never taken a riding course, but I would hope they cover that! I think, like you mentioned, I got complacent, and hopefully won’t, again. Like people say about the water, I just said to myself tonight I have great respect for the power of the motorcycle. And I would have been irritated too when those bystanders didn’t come to your assistance. All the best,

easterncoyote
 

flyinfree.00

New Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2016
Messages
189
Reaction score
1
Points
0
Location
US
I admire your gracious response to the convict’s comments. He is the one who should apologize. I dropped my bike 2 weeks ago maneuvering out of my parking garage. First time ever. It happens so quickly. I wish I had known about the turned wheel, hitting the brake thing. I have never taken a riding course, but I would hope they cover that! I think, like you mentioned, I got complacent, and hopefully won’t, again. Like people say about the water, I just said to myself tonight I have great respect for the power of the motorcycle. And I would have been irritated too when those bystanders didn’t come to your assistance. All the best,

easterncoyote
In the MSF curriculum stopping with the handlebars straight is one of the first things shown on the range.

If you haven't taken it you should. Almost everyone learns something even people who have been riding for years.

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
 

MalcolmReynolds

Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 24, 2017
Messages
237
Reaction score
0
Points
16
Location
Serenity
I second that, everyone learns at an MSF course even us old timers. Some of it is just forgotten stuff, some of it is new, but great learning.

I tend to try and cover my rear brake in parking lot slow speed situations because of exactly this scenario with making a turn and having to hit the brake. Had it happen more than once where someone pulled out right in front of me in a parking lot situation and you are forced to hit the brakes and sometimes you're in a awkward position. The front brake can put you in a pickle in that situation. Parking lots, entrances and exit locations are hot spots for this.
 

Convict1997

New Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2016
Messages
99
Reaction score
2
Points
0
Location
Concord NC
No apologies here. I stand behind my previous question. All too often, in motorcycling and many other facets of life, when something goes wrong, people look around for someone to blame. They’ll want someone else to pick up the pieces for them. If a bike was dropped without making contact with another object, then the rider is 100% to blame. If my bike were dropped, which has happened in the past, I wouldn’t want nor expect anyone else to help me pick it up unless I were unable to do it on my own. And with this bike, unless the rider were injured or otherwise physically limited, there should be no reason proper lifting techniques couldn’t be used to lift the bike back up, singlehandedly. This is not being said maliciously or as an attack on anyone. It is merely my point of view which doesn’t usually include a lot of coddling and hand holding.
 

superdedooperman

Site Supporter
Joined
Sep 17, 2017
Messages
321
Reaction score
9
Points
18
Location
Arkansas
No apologies needed. Just different point of views.

I choose to help others learn from my mistakes and try to help better the motorcycling community, as a whole. Everyone from beginners on. I, for one, am a newer rider still learning as much as I can. If I can help others do the same, that’s what I will do.

Back on topic, engine guards are a great addition to any motorcycle, IMO. They look great and are functional when needed.
 

potter0o

Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 19, 2015
Messages
1,152
Reaction score
87
Points
48
Location
Surrey, BC (Canada)
One of the added benefits of crash bars is that it is much easier to pick up the bike with them on. I have "tested" dropping with and without the crash bars and found the bars to be a much better option :)
 

easterncoyote

New Member
Joined
May 20, 2017
Messages
66
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
Guelph Ontario Canada
I would like to get some large crash bars like a lot of Harley’s have, which could double as highway foot rests, and most importantly, prevent my leg from getting pinned under the bike again, should it tip over. Does anyone know if this is possible? I asked at a local Harley dealer, and they didn’t seem too interested in trying to help me. All the crash bars I have seen in the forums are small engine-hugging types. Thank you.
 
Last edited:

AK64

New Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2017
Messages
26
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
South Carolina
I have these on my 2012 NC700X. They make it easier to pick up the bike after a drop. They don’t stick out far enough to act as foot rests, like many of the cruiser bars though. These bars have been great for protecting the bike, one drop on the right side, and a low speed crash on dirt/loose sand.
 

superdedooperman

Site Supporter
Joined
Sep 17, 2017
Messages
321
Reaction score
9
Points
18
Location
Arkansas
This is how they look on my bike. I really like the look of them. I've got the aux lights mounted to the inside of them, as well.

screen 1.jpg
 

easterncoyote

New Member
Joined
May 20, 2017
Messages
66
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
Guelph Ontario Canada
Thank you all for the information. They might do the trick! Of course, being in Canada, they want $63 to ship them :(. Are they pretty easy to install?
 

superdedooperman

Site Supporter
Joined
Sep 17, 2017
Messages
321
Reaction score
9
Points
18
Location
Arkansas
Thank you all for the information. They might do the trick! Of course, being in Canada, they want $63 to ship them :(. Are they pretty easy to install?
Very easy. You take the bottom cowl off and they attach using an existing bolt for the bottom. Then, connect the top portion via the supplied U-hook to the frame and you’re in business!
 
Top