Anyone used HiFlo air filter? opinion

670cc

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I haven't used a HiFlo air filter but if I needed a filter now I would buy this one. I believe most cars on the road today probably are running on aftermarket air filters, rather than OEM. I don't see this situation as being any different.
 
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I've been using HifloFiltros on my Yamaha dualsports (every 3000 miles) since day one, and a lot of others do as well. Saw some test data on them once and it was good.
 

ST13Fred

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The term hi-flo says it all. OEM filters are the old tried and true paper element design for a reason; they work best.
K&N are also hi-flo. They do not filter as well either.

Two engines at 100K miles, one OEM, one hi-flo filter, would be the real test. I've not seen anything like this but know the latter passes more contaminates.
 
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The term hi-flo says it all. OEM filters are the old tried and true paper element design for a reason; they work best.
K&N are also hi-flo. They do not filter as well either.

Two engines at 100K miles, one OEM, one hi-flo filter, would be the real test. I've not seen anything like this but know the latter passes more contaminates.

Sounds like pure hearsay to me based on a dislike of their name. Which is actually HIFLOFILTRO BTW. The ones I've seen often ARE paper (as well as dual-foam for dirt bikes where that type is favored) and often indistinguishable from the OEM ones. Which perhaps is not surprising; I guess they do make OEM filters for various companies. When I was checking into this years back quite a few online motorcycle stores where carrying hiflofiltro and reviews were good.
 
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670cc

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Two engines at 100K miles, one OEM, one hi-flo filter, would be the real test. I've not seen anything like this but know the latter passes more contaminates.

Did you mean know that the HiFlo brand paper element air filter passes more contaminates than OEM? Is that from your own testing, or some other published laboratory results? Can you share the data?

Or, did you mean a hi-flo filter in a generic sense?

I think the HiFlo name is just a marketing game name. People fall for terms like that, but it carries no more meaning than, for example, "heavy duty."
 
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AsureDawn

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As long as it doesn't have a history of falling apart, it should be fine. High airflow filters (as in, more than OEM) will generally allow more contaminants through, though the amount will vary depending on design. (my dad did a lot of research, I'd provide links if I had 'em)

As for disposable paper filters vs reusable ones you have to clean and oil, they both work well enough, it's just a matter of whether you want to deal with the extra maintenance or spend a few bucks every time you need a new one. My dad has a k&n in his Concours since the first time he did maintenance on it, and has had it for over 150k miles now (not sure of the exact number), that'd be about 15 filters for $32 aftermarket or $42 OEM, ~$630 over the life of the bike. Not a huge deal, but if you have five bikes it does add up.

As long as you keep up with maintenance, you can't really go wrong. ;)
 

ST13Fred

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A filter that is (assume) hi-flo will not filter as well as one with less flow given the same filtering area. I once saw a K&N warp along the seal allowing contaminates past. Some carb engines will run poorly unless rejetted.
As we all know air/oil filtering is critical to engine longevity. Personally, for my piece of mind, with such a huge array of aftermarket products available OEM is safest for me.

The HIFLOFILTRO, Greenboy, do look like quality products.
 

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Just don,t trust my bike to cheap replacement filters , yes they are not cheap but I use and trust K&N air and oil filters. These may be over kill but again they are safe and sure.
 

mreric

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thank you for all of those that responded ! i would like to physically get one in my hand to see the diff between OEM and HIFlo. in my experience OEM filter seem to have this cotton feel, while most aftermarket just has the feel of paper.
 

showkey

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Just don,t trust my bike to cheap replacement filters , yes they are not cheap but I use and trust K&N air and oil filters. These may be over kill but again they are safe and sure.


Safe and sure ??????? I am sure that K&N air filters might be one of the most controversial products in the air filter aftermarket. Has been hashed and rehashed here and many other forums.
 

ST13Fred

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i would like to physically get one in my hand to see the diff between OEM and HIFlo. in my experience OEM filter seem to have this cotton feel, while most aftermarket just has the feel of paper.

You've nailed the million $ question and only lab tests would disclose how much contaminates get by. A cotton feel makes me think hi-flo........OK better not go down that road again.
 

Bandit

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K&N replacement filters are safe and sure ! No damage has ever been proven by the use of a K&N REPLACEMENT air filter properly installed in a stock air box. I have used K&N for the last 50 years never had any issue nore have I ever been told by another rider that a replacement filter cause damage ,note I repeat replacement not change to airbox.
 

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I bought an K&N airfilter which is an high airflow filter. On the eye it did not look like the quality and size of the mesh was different than the stock Honda one. What was a big difference is the surface area of the airfilters. The OEM Honda filter was smaller than the K&N filter. Bigger surface area means more space for the air to pass through which means a higher airflow.
 
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Sidestepping all the typical K&N controversy, I don't see why the NC would need more surface area. It's already a big air filter.
 

670cc

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I bought an K&N airfilter which is an high airflow filter. On the eye it did not look like the quality and size of the mesh was different than the stock Honda one. What was a big difference is the surface area of the airfilters. The OEM Honda filter was smaller than the K&N filter. Bigger surface area means more space for the air to pass through which means a higher airflow.
If you like the K&N filter, that’s nice. My observation is that air flow through the NC engine is significantly limited by the cylinder head’s single intake and exhaust port design. With a K&N filter, no filter, or whatever, I don’t know what is to gain trying to increase air flow through the air box. I have no reason to suspect that Honda restricts air flow through the air box by design. As greenboy suggested, the stock air filter is already quite large.
 

Bugs

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If you like the K&N filter, that’s nice. My observation is that air flow through the NC engine is significantly limited by the cylinder head’s single intake and exhaust port design. With a K&N filter, no filter, or whatever, I don’t know what is to gain trying to increase air flow through the air box. I have no reason to suspect that Honda restricts air flow through the air box by design. As greenboy suggested, the stock air filter is already quite large.

Oh I have never said anything about real performance upgrades of using a high airflow filter. I did not dyno my bike before and after. All I said is that I believe it has more airflow because the surface area is larger than that of the OEM airfilter. And not because the function of filtering the air is worse than a OEM airfilter. My comment was more focussed on the discussion of the quality of filtering the air, not performance boosts. I bought an K&N filter because I prefer the method of cleaning and reusing it instead of throwing the old one away.
 

ST13Fred

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It's a peace of mind thing for me. The quality of air my engines are consuming is the best I can give them with paper element. Hi Flo is junk food.
K&N had an ad years ago; 'the dirtier it gets the better it filters.' What?!!!
Oil will stay cleaner longer in a paper element configured engine than hi-flo IMO. We're probably splitting hairs here in the long run but a strong running engine is a happy engine.
And with a Honda engine a smooooth running engine.
 

670cc

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It's a peace of mind thing for me. The quality of air my engines are consuming is the best I can give them with paper element. Hi Flo is junk food.
K&N had an ad years ago; 'the dirtier it gets the better it filters.' What?!!!
Oil will stay cleaner longer in a paper element configured engine than hi-flo IMO. We're probably splitting hairs here in the long run but a strong running engine is a happy engine.
And with a Honda engine a smooooth running engine.

Is there an explanation, evidence or examples to support the “Hi Flo is junk food” statement? You capitalized Hi Flo, so I’m assuming you are referring to the company or brand, not high flow as a general air filter characteristic.

While you didn’t exactly say it, I think you’re strongly suggesting that Hiflo air filters are not paper filtering media. From what I have read, and from observing the Hiflo air filters I have used, they appear to be paper element filters and almost indistinguishable from the OEM Honda NC filter. Hiflofiltro claims on their web site that they supply filters to OEMs, although they don’t say which OEMs. Here is a snip from Hiflofiltro’s web site that indicates they are using filter paper in their products:

“Materials
To achieve our quality aims and to ensure the consistency of our products, we use only premium materials from well known manufacturers: steel from Toyota Tsusho and NKK Japan, glue from Henkel Germany, filter paper from Ahlstrom Filtration Finland, Hollingsworth & Vose USA and Awa Paper Japan.”

Are the “Hi Flo” filters you are calling junk food something different than the paper element filters made by the Hiflofiltro company?
 
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