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X-Ring Chain Disintegrate?

jackthebiker

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I do not believe in chain oilers. I have had two bikes with over 17,000 miles bought new and sold with the chains still good. I use Dupont Chain Wax and do not clean. My 2016 Kawasaki Versys 1000 LT(over 100 hp to the rear wheel), and my 2015 Triumph Bonneville T100. Now my 2018 NC750X is looking good at 6000 miles. (except for the deer damage)
 

Bskicrash1

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As I wanted to have some manual control over oiling of the chain, I finally opted for this GIDIAII oiler found on AliExpress which is a copy of the Cobrra oiler but 6 times cheaper. Quality is impressive, comes with all what's needed for installation and even some spare parts! With gear oil, the functionality is exactly as described. Really like it.

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I also have this same model installed on my klr650. I would recommend it for anyone who is interested in an oiler and wants manual control. Auto oilers work wonders. On my NC I use dry Teflon lube and my chain is clean, rust free and no dirt sticks to it.
 

jackthebiker

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I do not believe in chain oilers. I have had two bikes with over 17,000 miles bought new and sold with the chains still good. I use Dupont Chain Wax and do not clean. My 2016 Kawasaki Versys 1000 LT(over 100 hp to the rear wheel), and my 2015 Triumph Bonneville T100. Now my 2018 NC750X is looking good at 6000 miles. (except for the deer damage)
Well I have found out that the stock NC750X chain is junk like the stock Dunlop tires. Tires shot at 3000 miles, now the chain at 11,000 miles. Avon Trailriders have worked out well, now a RK chain that I hope works out good too.
 

mtnbiker1185

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I do not believe in chain oilers. I have had two bikes with over 17,000 miles bought new and sold with the chains still good. I use Dupont Chain Wax and do not clean. My 2016 Kawasaki Versys 1000 LT(over 100 hp to the rear wheel), and my 2015 Triumph Bonneville T100. Now my 2018 NC750X is looking good at 6000 miles. (except for the deer damage)
I have never seen a compelling enough argument to justify the cost for me. People claim they make their chains last longer but I have never seen an actual mileage comparison of same chain and sprockets, ridden on the same type of roads, in the same manner to show actually how much longer that is. Usually it is "the stock chain only went 8,000 miles but the aftermarket one with oiler went 20,000. It over doubled my mileage!" Did it? Or was the stock chain shit?
I suspect that while they probably do cause the chain to last longer, I doubt it is by enough that the oiler would pay for itself in any reasonable amount of time for most individuals. For example, I spent $121 from Sprocket Center for a new chain and sprockets on my bike. The cheapest ScottOiler system is $140. So the oiler would have to net me however many miles that chain and sprockets would go if I didn't use it before it would pay for itself. In other words, lets say that that chain and sprockets would normally last me 20,000 miles and the oiler gains me an extra 2,000 miles. It would take 10 chain and sprocket changes before it paid for itself. That is 200,000 miles, and it is assuming the oiler doesn't require any addition money for worn out parts, etc. That is long past the life span of the bike for all but a very few number of people.

To me, they would need to net me a 25% increase in chain life per chain for it to make it worth thinking about. And that would still put the bike at over 100,000 miles with the above scenario. For most individuals, you are talking upwards of 10 years to recoup that money assuming you don't sell the bike before then...which most people do.

To be clear, to each their own. If you want one so you don't have to think about chain maintenance that often, more power to you. But for me, with all the longer it takes to oil a chain the only real incentive is cost and the math just doesn't add up in that respect.
 

TheIronWarrior

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With absence of actual data, I'd assume an auto oiler is only worth the "convenience factor" (read: laziness). If you oil your chain regularly, an oiler isn't going to make much of a difference.
I've heard many arguments for and against cleaning, and the most compelling (again, without actual data) is that old (non-sealed) chains needed to be cleaned and oiled often to extend life, but that modern (sealed) chains take much less maintenance to have a good service life. The risks of chewing up seals while brushing are also often discussed, and the general consensus is that using an oily rag is the "best" way to clean.

My opinion based on interpreting the opinions and observations of others (note, complete lack of anything concrete) is that regularly oiling (manually or auto) with something liquid-y enough to fling off is going to do a good job of keeping things clean and lubed, and anything more is going to add up to diminishing returns as far as marginal life extension for more significant effort and costs. If regularly riding in dirt, this may not apply.
Note, the above is pure opinion and not rooted in data.
 

DTMWAP

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I had a look at the operation of that oiler on the web. The video was under the Nemo brand but the same. Interesting idea. A report on its operation and efficiency would be appreciated at some point.
Really like the GUDIAII oiler. At approximately each 500km you only have to make 1/4 turn of the top cap while driving. 3 seconds operation. It is the first time I install this semi-automatic oiler and it would be one of the first farkles on my next motorcycle.

PROS:
No more wasted time lubing the chain manually
Cheap; 25.97$ CDN (~20$ USD) delivered to my door
Works exactly as described
Quality components
Easy installation
Uses cheap gear oil which BTW I think is the best

CONS
Took 1 h for installation
Sprocket and wheel gets a bit more dirty
 

Sandspike

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I've been thinking about it for a long time, from now on, no more chain cleaning, no more fancy chain lube; gear oil. Now shopping for an automatic oiler; any recommendations?
Motobriiz. Only one that makes sense. It’s air powered and the faster you go, the more it oils the chain. I put it under the pillion seat in the back between hinge.
 
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showkey

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More oil is not necessarily better……..it attracts dirt and dust, making perfect grinding compound.
More oil just makes a mess on the rear wheel and adjacent parts.
More oil can force the factory lube out of the oring sealed chain.
Oring chain needs just enough oil to keep the rust away,
 

MZ5

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The Motobriiz oiler is simultaneously the 'most automatic' in that it applies oil at a faster rate the faster you ride, and also a very good value overall. If you like an auto-oiler, you owe it to yourself to take a close or second look at Motobriiz.
 
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