Winterize NC750X

melensdad

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Personally I don't winterize at all. Even in the winter there are occasional days when it is unseasonably warm, I will sneak out for a short ride on those days. I do have a multi-port battery tender hanging from the ceiling and I plug the bikes, a scooter and our golf cart into that to keep the batteries in shape during the winter months. Other than that, there is no winter 'preparation' here.
 

670cc

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Answers would depend on where you live. I’d think people living in normally hot climates would do more riding in the winter, and very little in the summer.

We have some good days in the winter where I live, but sometimes long stretches of ice and snow that make riding impossible. I may put a little stabilizer in the fuel tank of the fuel injected motorcycles, maintain battery charge, and keep them ready to ride anytime. On the other hand, our scooters have carburetors so those carbs get drained and the scooters don’t get ridden until spring. All the bikes are winter stored in an unheated building and their batteries remain installed. Cold batteries have a longer lifespan, from my experience.
 
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Havok

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Answers would depend on where you live. I’d think people living in normally hot climates would do more riding in the winter, and very little in the summer.

We have some good days in the winter where I live, but sometimes long stretches of ice and snow that make riding impossible. I may put a little stabilizer in the fuel tank of the fuel injected motorcycles, maintain battery charge, and keep them ready to ride anytime. On the other hand, our scooters have carburetors so those carbs get drained and the scooters don’t get ridden until spring. All the bikes are winter stored in an unheated building and their batteries remain installed. Cold batteries have a longer lifespan, from my experience.
Just wondering if you have had any problems storing the scooters dry? The old argument of wet vs dry with carbs. Seals and o-rings drying out. Personally I always store my carb stuff wet with Seafoam in the gas and never had any problems.
 

670cc

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Just wondering if you have had any problems storing the scooters dry? The old argument of wet vs dry with carbs. Seals and o-rings drying out. Personally I always store my carb stuff wet with Seafoam in the gas and never had any problems.
No problems with storing carburetors dry. I do it with probably 8 to 10 of my engines (scooters, mowers, generators, etc). Some low use engine carburetors are drained after every time the engine is used.

The best example of success is I have a Honda lawn mower I bought in 1984, that is used regularly every summer. It even runs on 10% ethanol gas because that is really all I can buy here. The carb bowl is drained for every winter storage. It starts on the first pull every spring. After 36 years now, the carburetor and it’s internal parts are still all original. I do put a thin coating of oil in the steel carb bowl so it won‘t rust while is is drained.

The problem I see with storing carb bowls wet on gravity feed fuel systems is the continual evaporation of fuel. Carbs are vented to the atmosphere. Stabilizer does not prevent the volatile components of the fuel from evaporating and leaving the “crud“ behind. If you do store the carbs wet, be sure to shut off the fuel valve. But my guess is by spring, the bowl will be partly empty because the fuel evaporated.
 
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MZ5

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When I lived in cold country, I put stabilizer in the fuel and put the engine or vehicle away after either running it long enough to make sure it was fully circulated through the system, or with carbs I’d often shut off the petcock and then let the engine run until it died.

Now I ride during the winter. It’s the only sensible and pleasant time of the year to ride for fun, around here.
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