Shift lever adjustment

76Hawke

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Do these 2 nuts simply adjust the height of the shift lever over my toe? The toebox of my new boots doesn't seem to allow for a reset after upshifting without a concerted effort to point my toe down hard after every shift.
As I look at this, it seems adjusting the nuts will just affect the shift lever height and give me a bit more space? If this is the case, do i turn each nut a bit and split the difference, or just adjust the rear nut?
...Or is this a bad idea that won't help with my big feet?
I tried looking to the service manual to see if there is any mention of this which I couldn't find.
Thanks20201005_171644.jpg
 

Foxtrot144

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I hunted through my manual and page 11-19 & 11-20 shows Gearshift Pedal Removal/Installation. It gives a prescribed length of 91.1 mm for the 2012-2013 NC700X. That pushrod probably needs to stay the same. Let me know if this image is a no-no

I wonder if a machine shop could make you the pedal with a longer arm?

IMG_7366.JPG
 

CapeMan

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I don't have a manual shift so this is just an educated guess ...

Often these kind of linkages have a right-hand thread on one end of the linkage bar and a left-handed thread on the other. If that's the case here, you can loosen both locking nuts (one is lefty-loosey, the other righty-loosey) and spin the linking bar to increase or decrease the overall distance. Looking at the picture, it appears that shortening the linkage will raise the height of the shift lever. Don't forget to re-tighten the locking nuts. Squinting hard at the pic, it looks like the forward lock nut is left handed??

If necessary, you might could also pull the bell crank arm on shaft coming out of the tranny and re-attach after rotating it one spline in the direction that suits ya best, then fine-tune with the linkage bar.
 

76Hawke

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I hunted through my manual and page 11-19 & 11-20 shows Gearshift Pedal Removal/Installation. It gives a prescribed length of 91.1 mm for the 2012-2013 NC700X. That pushrod probably needs to stay the same. Let me know if this image is a no-no

I wonder if a machine shop could make you the pedal with a longer arm?

View attachment 43251
Last entry in the chapter, good eye! I looked up shift pedal, not gearshift.. thanks.
 

76Hawke

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I don't have a manual shift so this is just an educated guess ...

Often these kind of linkages have a right-hand thread on one end of the linkage bar and a left-handed thread on the other. If that's the case here, you can loosen both locking nuts (one is lefty-loosey, the other righty-loosey) and spin the linking bar to increase or decrease the overall distance. Looking at the picture, it appears that shortening the linkage will raise the height of the shift lever. Don't forget to re-tighten the locking nuts. Squinting hard at the pic, it looks like the forward lock nut is left handed??

If necessary, you might could also pull the bell crank arm on shaft coming out of the tranny and re-attach after rotating it one spline in the direction that suits ya best, then fine-tune with the linkage bar.
Thanks for looking. This was my thought as well.
Looking at the diagram (and its recommended prescribed length) makes me wonder if it might pinch or create friction at the ball joints though..
 

670cc

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CapeMan has it right in post #3. The front lock nut appears to be the left hand thread.

I would avoid moving the bellcrank to a different spline location on the shifter shaft. Doing so alters the geometry of the
linkage in unfavorable ways. The dot punched on the shift shaft end indicates where the bellcrank clamp slot should be located.
 

CapeMan

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Yep, ideally, you'd like to see both crank arms parallel (and of the same length) so that any degree of rotation by one arm is exactly matched by the same rotation on the other. And resetting the tranny bell crank by one spline would, indeed, throw this relationship off a bit. For that matter, shortening or lengthening the link arm does this too, to a more limited extent.

But I'm not sure how significant this is. I mean, we're not talking about any kind of fine control mechanism here - there's probably a fair amount of slop in this linkage and the travel limits are, I think, set in tranny itself. I'd guess that as long as you're able to reach the upshift and downshift limits without getting the linkage out of whack or requiring excessive force, you'll be fine.

As far as this or any concerns about binding up the ball joints are concerned - my approach is to twiddle a wrench or two and just see how it all works. If you're not happy with what ya see, put it back the way it was. Start with the link arm first and see if that does the job.

Edit: And if you think you really need to maintain that linkage in full stock configuration, I'd guess about your only shot at raising the shift pad would be to cut and re-weld the arm or install lower foot pegs.
 
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Foxtrot144

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Edit: And if you think you really need to maintain that linkage in full stock configuration, I'd guess about your only shot at raising the shift pad would be to cut and re-weld the arm or install lower foot pegs.


Yeah that's what I was thinking over dinner tonight. It'd probably be safer and simpler to adjust the foot peg than the gear shift.

SW-Motech sells a set of adjustable footpegs for our bikes, at least they used to a couple years back.
 

670cc

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One of the first things I do with a new bike is to adjust all the controls to match me. That means adjusting the levers, the brake pedal height, and definitely adjusting the shifter lever. The shifter lever is adjustable for a reason. Adjust it!
 
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