Rear mudguard from ebay

670cc

Super Moderator
Staff member
Super Mods
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 7, 2012
Messages
7,271
Reaction score
170
Points
63
Location
USA
It might protect the shock from some direct blast.

The negative aspects:
It's short, so it won't offer much protection.
Also because it's short, the rear wheel will still toss debris up on top of it.
The single zip tie mounting method is a disaster waiting to happen. Pyramid Plastics used this cheap method, too, but it didn't always end well.
 

Charlie

New Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2019
Messages
23
Reaction score
1
Points
0
Location
Wilton NZ
Most rear huggers are useless practically but somehow make a bike look better. Invariably too short to capture tyre-fling and there are better ways to protect a monoshock unit any linkage.

The naked rear wheel on my S displeased me so I bought this fine attempt via ebay.

It is long enough and the front extends low enough to be shock-protective.

To help with the overall appearance of the bike I painted the 'fender' portion white.




The unit includes the chainguard and while quite adequate I opted to fit a flat sheet metal top to prevent any chain fling from finding its way up into the fender area.


The unit comes from Moscow, took just two weeks to reach me in NZ, cost was fair and fitted well with just a little work on the three fixings.
 

670cc

Super Moderator
Staff member
Super Mods
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 7, 2012
Messages
7,271
Reaction score
170
Points
63
Location
USA
Well, then there's this -

Honda NC700S / NC700X (16+) Shock Shield - Rear Hugger Alternative 811001M | eBay
View attachment 39476

But it's also unclear how you mount it to the bike
It's not very pretty, but I think it would be way more functional than any typical hugger design. You're right, it's not clear how it's attached. Pyramid's front Fenda Extenda attaches with double sided tape. I wonder if that's what they've done with this shock shield, too. Here is more info: Honda NC 750 X Shock Shield Matte Black 2016> | Pyramid Plastics

A simple solution is to hang a rubber flap down from the under seat fender to the swingarm. That's a typical OEM method on a dirt bike. You could build your own for a few dollars.
 
Last edited:

kaz

Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2019
Messages
59
Reaction score
1
Points
6
Location
b
Graham, that looks sweet. How much does it cost? And what's that yellow thing on your luggage rack? :)

Greg, are you talking about this?
YouTube

(btw, where are the thank you/like on the phone version of the forum?)
 

Matty

New Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2019
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Peacehaven
Not worth it, as I had the Pyramid version and it did almost nothing to stop the crap getting to the shock. Not only that, I took it off for cleaning the other day and it has worn through the paint to bare metal on my brand new NC750X swing arm!
Only fitted it a few months ago, so not impressed!

I got one of these from ebay: s-l1600.jpg

Fitting guide here: YouTube

Does a superior job of keeping crap away from the shock, and cost way less than a hugger.
 

superdedooperman

Site Supporter
Joined
Sep 17, 2017
Messages
312
Reaction score
4
Points
18
Location
Arkansas
Graham, that looks sweet. How much does it cost? And what's that yellow thing on your luggage rack? :)

Greg, are you talking about this?
YouTube

(btw, where are the thank you/like on the phone version of the forum?)
That white really does pop!

The yellow thing appears to be a reflector, no?
 

Charlie

New Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2019
Messages
23
Reaction score
1
Points
0
Location
Wilton NZ
kaz
About US$380. The yellow disc is a home made reflector. Same other side. Reflective strip on header tank both sides too.
 

SilverRocket

Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 13, 2017
Messages
267
Reaction score
3
Points
18
Location
West Los Angeles, California
I bought the Givi tire hugger (not from Revzilla) and used it for a while. I liked how it looked, but installation was a PITA. No usable instructions, as usual.

I took it off for a full cleaning of the bike and could never get it put back on correctly. It called for using spacers underneath the plastic, I think it might have been missing some hardware, and it ended up crooked, so I removed it and went back to the much-easier-to-remove stock chain guard.
If you want it I'll let it go for $20. Just be sure to have lots of spacers, washers, bolts, and patience!

The Givi looks very modern and all and does do a decent job of keeping the shock clean, but there is still going to be some spray thrown up on the underside of the fender.
 

Attachments

kaz

Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2019
Messages
59
Reaction score
1
Points
6
Location
b
I think I'll start with a cut-out rubber mat, still wonder if a shock sleeve is a good idea as far as humidity
 

use2b

Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
21
Points
8
Location
Perdido Key Florida
I have them front and rear. the front one did not fit so well and needed a single hole drilled but well worth it as i was getting mud in the radiator .
The rear i like as it helps with the shock area and bolted down nicely while the strap held it in place.
 

Attachments

Top