No start, bad button?

mtiberio

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Bike would not start the other day, thinking the battery was flat, I put the charger on it. Later it started, so I said, ok, I just left the key on (I do use the side stand as a kill switch often). Yesterday, it wouldn't start again, and the battery was at 12.5 volts. Out comes the manual and ohm-meter.

Following the troubleshooting guide in chapter 6 of the manual, it seems I have an issue with one of the switches or relays in the starting circuit. I did notice that the starter button is feeling odd and seems to have a 2 step, intermediate click to it which I don't remember.

Before I really start tearing into things, has anyone else had a failure of the starter button or the side stand switch. My bike is a DCT, so there is no clutch switch.

Thanks,
Mike
 

Techrat

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I also have the DCT version, which I took an advanced riding class. I used the switch a couple of time during the class and my riding coach warned me about that possibility. He said that new riders are trained in class to use the cut-off switch so that in an emergency its use is muscle memory, but over time the switch can wear out and have to be replaced. And you definitely don't want the switch to break when you're out riding because when you stop you'll need a tow to get home or to a mechanic.

So, you shouldn't use the button to turn off the bike, you should use the key or put down the kickstand. I prefer the kickstand method. This forces me to remember to put the kickstand down before I plan to dismount. I have to take the key to lock my helmet in the top box, so I won't forget that.

I also spoke to a Honda mechanic to confirm this. He said that the replacement of the cut-off switch is a common repair. He also warned it shouldn't be used much and that over use can cause it to fail.

Techrat.
 

mtiberio

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I guess I wasn't clear. I use the side stand to kill the motor most of the time I stop. I never use the kill switch and rarely use the ignition switch.

It is the starter button that feels wonky.
 
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lue42

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Just to be sure... are you saying that you don't turn your key to the off position when you drop your kickstand ("I just left the key on", "rarely use the ignition switch"). I shut my engine off that way too, but you still have to turn the bike off.

Did you check your kill switch anyway?

I don't have a DCT, but I thought I saw a thread a while ago about shutting off the bike in gear and having issues with that... any chance that is related?
 

HarveyM

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Sounds like you've picked up some dirt in it. You might try shooting some contact cleaner into the switch.
(As for your stopping method Mother Honda says shift to neutral and use the key.)
 

rmezei

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I guess I wasn't clear. I use the side stand to kill the motor most of the time I stop. I never use the kill switch and rarely use the ignition switch.

It is the starter button that feels wonky.
Why in the world would you do this approach? That is just too funny...:eek:
 

mtiberio

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I like to coast to a stop most times. I put the side stand down with my foot while still rolling. Just a habit I developed over the years. With the ROX risers, its too much of a reach to get to the key, and using the kill switch has its own issues (like forgetting to turn it back on).
 

mtiberio

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Pulled a bunch of body work, side stand switch is good. Went back to the book, and took another look at the small start relay (in the fuse box). I pulled it and it checked out before, but this time I swapped it with the fan relay (small odds of fan coming on with winter coming). Bike started right up, and hasn't missed a beat since. We'll see how long it lasts... Maybe I'll order some relays...
 

Madison Sully

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So, if the choice is between:
1. The kill switch.
2. The sidestand kill switch.
3. The ignition (which is also a switch).

I guess I'm confused why using the kill switch is bad because it might wear out a switch???
 

showkey

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No confusion................just different ways of thinking. Worrying about wearing out a switch is misplaced concern .........aleast for most of us in reality.


It’s like unscrewing the light bulb instead of using the switch to turn off a light or pulling the plug............results are the same you have determine the risks in each choice.

In the motorcycle community some believe it just good habits or always doing something the same way while others believe the electrons or the hardware care how the bike is shut off.
 
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670cc

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So, if the choice is between:
1. The kill switch.
2. The sidestand kill switch.
3. The ignition (which is also a switch).

I guess I'm confused why using the kill switch is bad because it might wear out a switch???
They’re all switches. Some day they will all wear out. One will wear out first, or one may fail prematurely. We have no data to know what the mean time between failures might be. So for now, I assume they all have the same life expectancy.

However, of the three switches, the sidestand is the most accessible. If it failed out in the wild, I could easily access the switch and wiring to disconnect it or to short it out, whatever I might need. The thing is, I operate the switch every time I raise and lower the kickstand, so using it to kill the engine or not does not cause the switch to cycle any more or less. The handlebar kill switch is not required to ever be switched to operator the motorcycle, so I might as well leave it alone.
 

DCTFAN

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They’re all switches. Some day they will all wear out. One will wear out first, or one may fail prematurely. We have no data to know what the mean time between failures might be. So for now, I assume they all have the same life expectancy.

However, of the three switches, the sidestand is the most accessible. If it failed out in the wild, I could easily access the switch and wiring to disconnect it or to short it out, whatever I might need. The thing is, I operate the switch every time I raise and lower the kickstand, so using it to kill the engine or not does not cause the switch to cycle any more or less. The handlebar kill switch is not required to ever be switched to operator the motorcycle, so I might as well leave it alone.
Good points. Too logical.
My AT as some other bikes have the starter integrated with the kill switch.
There have been some starting problems reported due to faulty switches.
 

mtiberio

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The no start issue has returned (twice actually). Left alone, it solves itself. I replaced all the small relays stuck in the fuse box. I'm wondering again if its the side stand switch or maybe the big relay next to the battery. No one has ever had this issue?
 

davidc83

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yep, switches are just switches and they will go bad; question is, do you want them to go bad in a position which will keep the bike from running. If the kill switch goes bad in the 'on' position, the bike wont start. If it goes bad in the 'off' position-your bike will start but you wont know about it unless you use it (in an emergency). I've accidently hit the kill switch but I don't normally use this switch to turn off the bike. The side stand has a switch due to the government's nanny mentality (older bikes don't have the side stand switch) but can be bypassed if you want and have the know-how. The ignition switch can be bypassed or changed if needed (my co-worker has a Honda Shadow- he lost the ignition key one day-no spare-but got online, looked up the bypass code on a couple of wires and started the bike without the ignition key). They all need to be cleaned occasionally (preferably with contact cleaner) or they can have intermittent results.
 
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