Question New DCT rider?

the Ferret

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I didnt have to ride mine home very far, but there really is no difference between riding a DCT bike and a manual shift bike except you dont have to pull in a clutch and move a lever to change gears. You will want to, and you will twitch your left hand and left foot at first, but eventually you won't even do that. You will just ride like it's perfectly normal.

Throttle and brakes, throttle and brakes.
 
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Havok

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Rode my 2020 NC750x 100 miles home from dealer last summer. No test ride bought it sight unseen. I had never ridden a DCT before. It was weird the first couple of days. After that I don’t miss the clutch at all. Most of my riding is in city stop and go traffic.
It was the NC or an Indian Scout. Don’t regret the NC purchase one bit.
 

Oldbear

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It’ll feel a tad weird at first as you’ll miss the clutch lever and gear shift, but you’ll adapt pretty quickly, and even if you don’t the bike’ll take care of you. Just don’t blip the throttle at a stoplight
 

mudtrack

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I rode a Burgman 400 maxi scooter to the dealer to trade for a 2021 DCT NC750X. (My wife's bikes, but as she regains strength after chemotherapy she wanted me to do the riding.)
Neither the scooter nor the NC750X require shifting. The NC has so much low end torque, it reminds me of my diesel truck - it really pulls at low rpm.
The scooter has a rear brake at the left hand, where my V-Strom clutch is.
The NC750X is easier to manage at low speed than the scooter - they are both low center of gravity but there is nothing to squeeze the knees on a scooter. (I hate this about scooters, no thigh and knee pressure control.)
The NC is super, super low center of gravity compared to my V-Strom, giving the NC ecxeptional low speed control.

I really like my wife's DCT. I am envious.
 

the Ferret

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I rode a Burgman 400 maxi scooter to the dealer to trade for a 2021 DCT NC750X. (My wife's bikes, but as she regains strength after chemotherapy she wanted me to do the riding.)
Neither the scooter nor the NC750X require shifting. The NC has so much low end torque, it reminds me of my diesel truck - it really pulls at low rpm.
The scooter has a rear brake at the left hand, where my V-Strom clutch is.
The NC750X is easier to manage at low speed than the scooter - they are both low center of gravity but there is nothing to squeeze the knees on a scooter. (I hate this about scooters, no thigh and knee pressure control.)
The NC is super, super low center of gravity compared to my V-Strom, giving the NC ecxeptional low speed control.

I really like my wife's DCT. I am envious.
The really nice thing about a proper scooter is the step thru design for mounting. My wife has had a hip and two knee replacements and can no longer mount a motorcycle conventionally as she can't swing her leg that high, even stepping on the peg. She tried getting on my NC. It was a no go. So we are currently looking for another scooter for her. She'd like another 400 Majesty but might settle for a Yamaha 300 if we can find one. Another nice thing is both the brakes operated by the hands as alloo66 mentioned. I wouldn't mind having a rear hand brake on the DCT but I'm not about to rig one up.
 

dduelin

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I rode a Burgman 400 maxi scooter to the dealer to trade for a 2021 DCT NC750X. (My wife's bikes, but as she regains strength after chemotherapy she wanted me to do the riding.)
Neither the scooter nor the NC750X require shifting. The NC has so much low end torque, it reminds me of my diesel truck - it really pulls at low rpm.
The scooter has a rear brake at the left hand, where my V-Strom clutch is.
The NC750X is easier to manage at low speed than the scooter - they are both low center of gravity but there is nothing to squeeze the knees on a scooter. (I hate this about scooters, no thigh and knee pressure control.)
The NC is super, super low center of gravity compared to my V-Strom, giving the NC ecxeptional low speed control.

I really like my wife's DCT. I am envious.
Depends on the scooter and how it allows one to sit on it. The Elite 80 I have has a very long seat and I can sit back on the seat and place my feet on the passenger foot pegs. It's a motorcycle triangle of seat, grips, and pegs with my thighs against the seat. Still, scooters don't lend themselves to great handling dynamics with generally short wheelbases, feet forward seating, small diameter tires and extreme rear weight bias.
 

670cc

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Depends on the scooter and how it allows one to sit on it. The Elite 80 I have has a very long seat and I can sit back on the seat and place my feet on the passenger foot pegs. It's a motorcycle triangle of seat, grips, and pegs with my thighs against the seat. Still, scooters don't lend themselves to great handling dynamics with generally short wheelbases, feet forward seating, small diameter tires and extreme rear weight bias.
Yes, it depends on the scooter. You mentioned generally short wheel bases and I got to thinking about that and looked up some specs. I found that our Reflex 250 scooter has a wheelbase 0.2 inches longer that the NC700X wheelbase. I think with the engine typically integrated into the swingarm, some scooters can tend to be long. That might add some high speed stability to make up for the small wheels.

Edit with more wheelbase comparisons:
Honda Ruckus 49cc scooter 49.8” vs Honda Grom 124cc motorcycle 47.2”.
Honda PCX 157cc scooter 51.7” vs Honda Trail 125 motorcycle 49.4”

It seems that scooters often have longer wheelbases than motorcycles.
 

dduelin

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Yes, it depends on the scooter. You mentioned generally short wheel bases and I got to thinking about that and looked up some specs. I found that our Reflex 250 scooter has a wheelbase 0.2 inches longer that the NC700X wheelbase. I think with the engine typically integrated into the swingarm, some scooters can tend to be long. That might add some high speed stability to make up for the small wheels.

Edit with more wheelbase comparisons:
Honda Ruckus 49cc scooter 49.8” vs Honda Grom 124cc motorcycle 47.2”.
Honda PCX 157cc scooter 51.7” vs Honda Trail 125 motorcycle 49.4”

It seems that scooters often have longer wheelbases than motorcycles.
Sure, thanks for that. Scooters less than 250cc was what I was thinking when I wrote it. Maxi scooters are a better comparison though and they do tend to be longer overall.
 

mudtrack

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I think the sweet spot for scooters is around 150cc like our former Honda PCX. Best in city, where it belongs. Top speed 60mph.
My wife bought her Burgman 400 because she wanted to be able to keep up with freeway traffic. Success.
However it lost that nimble feeling in the city. Very heavy to move around. Nearly impossible to put up on centerstand. At highway speed the small wheels did not contribute to the gyroscopic effect. Capable of keeping up with freeway traffic, yet had that scooter twitchy sensation at that speed.

The NC750X is likely going to be my wife's new sweet spot.
 
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