NC750x DCT <-- Drive Mag, Best Commuter Motorcycle

melensdad

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Drive Magazine, a smaller moto magazine, considered commuter motorcycles.

 

melensdad

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DCT certainly is a boon in towns and cities. If I spent a lot more time in those evirons I would not have purchased a manual-shift NC.
Got to admit that I just love the twist and go transmission and I live 6 miles outside of the nearest small town. Certainly the DCT has huge advantages in the city/suburban traffic but I sure don't miss the clutch lever.
 

greenboy

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I do so many shifts without the clutch lever thanks to a very good clutch and transmission the only time it gets to me is in lots of intersection-controlled and stop-and-go (and often crawl) traffic. I LIKE shifting.
 

melensdad

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Shifting aside, I think we can all agree the FRUNK is an amazing convenience on these bikes.

That alone makes these great commuter machines. Add the FRUNK to the economy to the handling and toss in the DCT and this is a GREAT city bike. As many of us also attest, its a pretty darn good lightweight touring bike too.
 

greenboy

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Frunk and fuel economy, yes. And long service intervals and for its weight a low CG.

...A lot of people – many who haven't even ridden one – say the bike is boring, without character. I have fun on mine every time I ride it. Getting the most out of any bike is an art perhaps ; }
 

dduelin

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DCT certainly is a boon in towns and cities. If I spent a lot more time in those evirons I would not have purchased a manual-shift NC.
DCT is good stuff in the slick stuff. I have a friend that has a DCT Africa Twin who bought it on my recommendation (DCT that is). Tim does stuff offroad primarily and after a few thousand miles he was still thinking he made a mistake with DCT. Then one day he called me and told me the previous weekend he was riding in the North GA mountains on a dual sport weekend with friends on big KTMs - 1250s or 1290s, a KTM 500 and his DCT. They came up on a long uphill single track section of greasy red clay with irregular washed out cuts crosswise to the path. His DCT was the only bike that made it up the hill without having to be pushed. The 500 almost made it but crossing one of the washes the rear wheel broke traction and that was it. The big KTMs didn't get halfway up but the AT's DCT with traction control chugged all the way to the top. Each time the wheel broke traction within a revolution or two it hooked up again. He was a DCT convert and happy to tell me.
 

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Here's one of Bret Tkacs' videos talking and showing about DCT on an Africa Twin off-road. He's pretty much a bible on large heavy bikes in really technical terrain. Might be useful if one is always commuting via steep single track ; }

 

Janus

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DCT certainly is a boon in towns and cities. If I spent a lot more time in those evirons I would not have purchased a manual-shift NC.
I commuted through the Seattle and Tacoma metropolitan areas. No lane splitting legally allowed here.

MT bikes are just fine for that. I get why people might want a DCT for it, but I'm unconvinced of their utility. Maybe I'm just not old enough.

FWIW I also drive manual cars, I just don't like automatic transmissions in general. I like being connected and in control.
 

Janus

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Here's one of Bret Tkacs' videos talking and showing about DCT on an Africa Twin off-road. He's pretty much a bible on large heavy bikes in really technical terrain. Might be useful if one is always commuting via steep single track ; }

Hah Bret just called me out in the into— the one time I went over was stalling at just the wrong time. Turning right from a stop, didn't give it enough gas. Bike lurched down onto the front fork, as a stalled bike does, but with the fork fully turned it pushed me over. I didn't have enough leverage to save it and I dropped the bike on my boot, and got pushed into the sidewalk.

Remember to put your visor up and kickstand down before you lift, folks. :rolleyes:
 

melensdad

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MT bikes are just fine for that. I get why people might want a DCT for it, but I'm unconvinced of their utility. Maybe I'm just not old enough.
It's not a matter of age. It's a matter of preference.

I do know that the professional rider reviews of the DCT on the Africa Twin raved about it and preferred it over the manual for off road.

I also know that the convenience of the DCT on the NT just makes the bike that much easier from my personal experience. I don't care what anyone rides, I'm a RIDE YOUR OWN RIDE kind of guy, but if someone wants to hear me complain about the DCT they will hear nothing come out of my mouth because with the newest generation of DCT (starting in 2016) there is nothing wrong with the system, and there was very little wrong with it before this 3rd generation.
 

dduelin

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I commuted through the Seattle and Tacoma metropolitan areas. No lane splitting legally allowed here.

MT bikes are just fine for that. I get why people might want a DCT for it, but I'm unconvinced of their utility. Maybe I'm just not old enough.

FWIW I also drive manual cars, I just don't like automatic transmissions in general. I like being connected and in control.
A common notion still kicking after 10 years but that's just my opinion and worth what I charge for it. I have a fair amount of experience with manual and automatic transmissions and never experienced a lack of shifting or being not in control on a DCT bike or my CVT scooter. Another notion is that "now anyone can ride a motorcycle" as if we need to keep our shrinking numbers pure. To the contrary, to get the most out of my DCT bike it challenged me to master slightly different skills which is one of the things I liked about it.
 

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Yes. I watch DCT posts, people still benefit from really learning how to use it to best effect : }

Speaking of automatic transmissions (for cages): I hate the way some people drive with them in Glacier NP. The autos make it too easy to creep along without regard for people piling up behind them. If they want to really look at stuff they should freekin' pull over and get out! They have other bad habits too, but the main one is not noticing or caring about anybody else. </rant>
 

dduelin

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Yes. I watch DCT posts, people still benefit from really learning how to use it to best effect : }

Speaking of automatic transmissions (for cages): I hate the way some people drive with them in Glacier NP. The autos make it too easy to creep along without regard for people piling up behind them. If they want to really look at stuff they should freekin' pull over and get out! They have other bad habits too, but the main one is not noticing or caring about anybody else. </rant>
When the kids are little and you find yourself pushing a stroller through a crowd you find that people don't need a car to move slow, erratically and have no regard for others. The desire to clip a slow mover right in the heels to get em moving will present a test to the best.
 
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NCX19

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When I bought, the frunk was the selling point. DCT was a novelty, but ive come to appreciate it. However I do a lot of manual shifting. I make generous use of the downshift paddle, esp as most roads around my place are twisty county roads.
Find the paddle shifting response to be crisper and dare say better than if I manual shifted with clutch.
 

greenboy

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Well, I use the paddles in my wife's Honda FIT. She doesn't. It's a driving style pref. There's times when it feels good to get the extra dose of "oomph" ; }
 
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jreinhardt

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Why?

Clearly not my experience.

Years ago, I was lucky enough to be selected by Honda to demo the then new VFR 1200 DCT in CA at their expense, along with about 20 others from the VFR and BMW community. We were given extensive briefings on the bike, rode one full day and then went into focus groups. It was a great experience. During the tech briefings the DCT was a major focus. Honda's presenter stated "that to get the most out of the DCT, use both the auto mode and paddle shifters". He further explained that during commuting, touring or routine road riding the "full automatic mode" was the way to go. If riding twisties or technical roads use of the paddle shifters will enhance the performance and riding experience. This has been backed up by the head of the current Honda Demo Team, and DCT owner, (a member of one of the clubs I am active in (MSTA) and my own experience on three DCT bike models. To me one of the beauties of DCT is you can use it to fit your current ride conditions or riding style.

As an aside, not a single member of our group said they would likely buy the VFR 1200. Most of us loved the engine and DCT. But price, tank size, mileage, luggage size and weight killed it.
 
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