Is rear shock adjustable?

W

wildeone

Alter 1000km I went to honda for the first check... I asked them, fix the rear suspension to maximum. I want my bike hard. (Actually it won't be too hard)
The original suspension like the one on nc is very cheap... I'm 80kg, and I always run my bike alone... The bike is much better on this ways, doesn't shake as a boat... Pretty cool on straight and turns...
Just try guys...

well, actually I found it very hard fro the beginning. Definitely not like a boat. On bumpy roads I cannot drink my coffee...
 

Skeleton

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that part to be honest I don't understand, never been working with suspension so forgive me. I would think that for heavier riders the spring should be longer hence we should not tighten it but rather loosen it to have longer travel.
Can you explain it why my assumption is wrong? thanks

It helps to look at the shock assembly and its integration to the bike frame and swing arm.

Higher pre-load increases the amount of load (rider self weight) that must be applied before the shock assembly will begin to compress. Generally, bikes should have about 30% of sag (shock compression) when a rider is sitting on the bike - regardless of the rider's weight. So for the same bike, a heavy rider should dial up more pre-load.
 

670cc

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that part to be honest I don't understand, never been working with suspension so forgive me. I would think that for heavier riders the spring should be longer hence we should not tighten it but rather loosen it to have longer travel.
Can you explain it why my assumption is wrong? thanks

Well, the reason is the spring stiffness cannot be adjusted. You would need to substitute a different spring to change the stiffness or free length. So the only adjustment available on the bike is to change where the spring is mounted on the shock. By cranking the ring clockwise, you're moving the one end of the spring which, by way of the linkage, ends up raising the rear end of the motorcycle. The spring is still the same length (up to the point where you reach the end of the suspension travel).

If this was an old school twin shock rear suspension, the preload would adjust by way of stepped collars at the bottom of the springs. It would be obvious that you were raising bottom of the spring when you increased preload, thereby raising the back end of the bike. With the mono shock arrangement and the shock linkage on the NC, it's less obvious what's going on, but the effect is the same.

Another way to picture it is with a truck suspension where the spring is separate from the shock. The vehicle weight is resting on the springs. If you were to insert a spacer either under the spring, or on top of it, it doesn't matter which, the truck would be raised higher. Then when you increase the load in the truck, the springs would compress and the truck height would go back to the middle of the suspension travel as before. Thus, increasing the preload allows the truck height to be normal with the added load.
 
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DirtFlier

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Using the words "raising" or "lowering" is confusing for those who don't understand. Also using the word "detent" is wrong because that would imply definite stop points but the adjuster rings are similar to threading a nut on a bolt - you can turn it to any position and stop wherever you want.

The shock spring isn't being moved to a different position because it's still resting on the shock's lower stop. What is occurring is that preload (tension) on the spring is being changed via the adjuster rings to make the first inch or so of wheel travel either softer or harder, depending on which way the rings are turned. If adjusted to the extreme, this can also change seat height.

And this adjustment does have limits so the standard spring cannot be adjusted to fit everyone. This is why aftermarket springs are available.
 
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670cc

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Using the words "raising" or "lowering" is confusing for those who don't understand. Also using the word "detent" is wrong because that would imply definite stop points but the adjuster rings are similar to threading a nut on a bolt - you can turn it to any position and stop wherever you want.

The shock spring isn't being moved to a different position because it's still resting on the shock's lower stop. What is occurring is that preload (tension) on the spring is being changed via the adjuster rings to make the first inch or so of wheel travel either softer or harder, depending on which way the rings are turned.

I disagree. When the spring is loaded with the weight of the bike and rider, the spring adjuster rings on the shock do not have anything to do with "tension" on the spring. They simply reposition the spring on the shock, thereby raising or lowering the back of the bike.

The confusing word is "preload". It refers to a shock/spring assembly being preadjusted (preloaded) before mounting it on the motorcycle , i.e. there is no weight load on it. Adjusting the rings at that time does change tension on the spring because the spring is pushing against the mechanical limit of the shock. Once the shock/spring is mounted on the motorcycle and is loaded, the spring is not pushing on the mechanical limit of the shock. The motorcycle pushes on one end, and the adjuster collars push on the other. If the spring is not restricted by any mechanical limit in the suspension, when you turn the rings tighter, the spring doesn't compress more, it simply raises the bike.

In addition, some confusion comes from the industry practice of wrapping the spring around the shock on the motorcycle. This is not necessary, but it's convenient because it allows the spring and shock to share a common mounting point. I think if you picture the shock and spring as separate units, the concept of adjusting the mounting point (preload rings or collars) of one end of the spring would be less confusing. You would simply, in effect, be adding or removing a spacer from one end of the spring, raising or lowering the bike. The shock is just there to control movement, and absorb energy out of the system and convert it to heat.
 
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Alfred_bham

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Here's my take on Shocks & their Springs!!

The Springs handle the Load & the Shocks Dampen the Load!! Sag is the Spring adjusted Load Limit that allows the Shock to perform its Compression & Rebound dampening Duties!! A heavier load requires compressing (adjusting) the spring to achieve the appropriate Sag!! There is a Maximum & Minimum limit of load adjustment with the Spring, , measured by simply measuring the length of the spring when Proper Sag is reached!! That (minimum & Maximum) limit isn't shared by Honda on the NCX!! If the Load (Rider/Passenger/Strapped on Gear) exceeds the ability to achieve the correct Sag then a heavier spring is needed!! When proper Sag is reached then adjusting the Dampning will make the ride stiffer or lighter!! The Stock NCX does not have adjustable (compression or Rebound) dampening!! Adjust the sag, , , which is usually 30% of the unloaded travel of the shock, , , but remember that a heavier rider may not be able to get to that 30% without a heavier Spring!! To get a truly adjustable rear Suspension an aftermarket Damper & Spring will be necessary!! Cogent Dynamic is a really good choice!!
 

RobF

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After 7 weeks of nc ownership I've binned my standard shock and fitted a quality replacement. You won't believe the difference in ride quality until you try it. What was disappointing with the standard shock is the amount of corrosion. My bikes 7 weeks old with 700 miles on it, has been covered in acf50 from new. The rear shock looks like it's 5 years old.

Honda clearly don't believe in greasing anything during assembly. There's a steel sleeve that runs plain in the bottom of the shock. No assembly Grease on it at. None of the bolts for the rear shock have any grease on them. With all the crap the rear shock mount catches from the tyre and road it's only a matter of time before these start to wear and corrode. For the sake of a little grease now you can save a lot of grief in a few thousand miles.
 
W

wildeone

After 7 weeks of nc ownership I've binned my standard shock and fitted a quality replacement. You won't believe the difference in ride quality until you try it. What was disappointing with the standard shock is the amount of corrosion. My bikes 7 weeks old with 700 miles on it, has been covered in acf50 from new. The rear shock looks like it's 5 years old.

Honda clearly don't believe in greasing anything during assembly. There's a steel sleeve that runs plain in the bottom of the shock. No assembly Grease on it at. None of the bolts for the rear shock have any grease on them. With all the crap the rear shock mount catches from the tyre and road it's only a matter of time before these start to wear and corrode. For the sake of a little grease now you can save a lot of grief in a few thousand miles.

what quality replacement? can you do some pics?
IS it expensive and hard to replace? I may do the same.
thanks
 

ziggie

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I do know when I looked it up that a OEM just the shock is $500.00.about craped,that much for a shock.
 

Disastrous

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Thanks for all the contributors to this thread...I've completed my first adjustment. I only made 2 clockwise turns to see the difference. I'll probably add 2 more tomorrow. Eventually I am going to get a new one.
Regards,
Mark
 
W

wildeone

Thanks for all the contributors to this thread...I've completed my first adjustment. I only made 2 clockwise turns to see the difference. I'll probably add 2 more tomorrow. Eventually I am going to get a new one.
Regards,
Mark

please let us know if there is a difference.
 

Disastrous

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Hard to say...I was too preoccupied with my engine shutting off at 75 mph.
I believe any difference would be negligible. I was mainly trying to take the slack (is that sag?) out of it. You could push down on the seat and get several inches of play...its a little better now.
 

wheelwatcher

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You should dial in more preload than me. Afterwards, when you sit on bike, it should sag probably 30 mm - for regular roads. If you ride on bumpier roads, etc, than good stiffer, with 20 to 25 mm sag.

Note, I ride normal roads (regarding swales, dips, speed bumps), for which I have never bottomed out the suspension. My preload is set for 40 mm sag. My dressed weight (including tail bag) is about 200 lbs.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think you have it backwards. For bumpier roads, you want more, not less sag. Track racers use less sag, for a stiffer shock. Off-road riders set the shock with more sag for a more compliant ride.
 

kharli

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Its very easy to move my locking ring and I see no problem in regular adjustments . I keep mine oiled and hidden in a shock tube , though I have been warned that can keep damp in ,but for me in Scotland on my second rear shock, the dealer recommended a shock tube due to the filthy roads where I live and tons of aggressive mineral salt shovelled on all over the place .
 

Lewis

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Can anyone tell me what size wrench the two rings use. I've looked all over this forum and Google and I just can't find it. My other bikes either included the wrench in the toolkit or had remote adjustment.
Thanks.
 

Lewis

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So I figured out that the 2 toothed rings are what needs to be adjusted (loosen the top one and tighten the lower one to stop such sag) but what a b$tch to adjust them! Even with the rear suspension fully extended there was barely any room to maneuver the wrench (a universal double ended/sized wrench which I had to cut in half to stand any chance of using it). So unbelievably difficult.
 

DirtFlier

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At least on the NC700X, the only practical way to change the setting of the preload adj rings is via a long punch and hammer. Yes, it's ugly but does the job. The NC lacks the working space for the normal hook spanners to work efficiently.
 

Lewis

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So with the rear suspension being so challenging to adjust quickly to address different situations, e.g. rider only sometimes and two-up other times, or on road vs off road at times, what have any of you done in those cases?
 

DirtFlier

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Buy another shock and please don't restart the "shock thread" because everyone has their own favorite shock!
 
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