Is rear shock adjustable?

Skeleton

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As titled: Is rear shock adjustable?

(There was no wrench in our bike's tool kit. This made me think the shock can't be adjusted. On the other hand, I see a pair of detent rings on the shock, typical of adjustability.)
 

Lou Wambsganss

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The rings allow for adjustment of spring preload only. Basically, you can adjust your sag to meet your specific situation (luggage, rider and passenger weight, etc). No compression or damping adjustments.
 

Lou Wambsganss

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You can use the dedicated spanner wrench, or in a pinch you can use a large slip joint pliers or something similar. You can even use a punch and hammer. Basically, anything to get the rings unlocked, turned as desired, then relocked against each other. Just be careful to not damage the threads if not using the spanner.
 

Skeleton

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I really do want to increase the preload of this shock but don't see how I can do this. Our (my) rear shock looks strange. I suspect it CAN NOT be tuned for preload. Enclosed is photo of my shock.

On close inspection, it can be seen that the upper ring is not a freely-moving ring; instead, it is a detented flange fixed to the outer cylinder. I believe this is to allow assembly of the outer cylinder to the inner cylinder during manufacturing.

The lower ring (immediately below the upper ring) is free to rotate. This is used to set the preload; however, there is no locking mechanism which would prevent its gradual unwinding after being set in an intermediate position. Note, the photo shows the ring to be fully unwinded, as it sits in the highest attainable position.

...

1) How do you lock the preload ring into a lower position (preventing gradually unwinding)?
 

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Lou Wambsganss

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This is the part stackup on the rear shock. It's quick and dirty, but you get the idea. The purple outline shows the Rear Shock Body. The Adjuster Nut is blue, and the Locknut is red. The adjuster nut is what actually provides the thread bearing strength to contain the spring tension. This is why it has a longer threaded "body". The Locknut is only there to keep the adjuster nut from moving. It doesn't hold any weight, which is why it is thinner.


To adjust preload, follow these steps:

1. Back off Locknut.
2. Adjust Preload Adjuster Nut as desired to attain proper sag for your condition (weight, luggage, etc).
3. Tighten Locknut down onto Preload Adjuster Nut to prevent unintended loosening.

shock dwg small.jpg
 
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Skeleton

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Thanks everyone ... I did it.

MYSELF AS RIDER

Height = 5'-9"
Self = 170 lbs
Clothes = 10 lbs
Frunk = 15 lbs
Tailbag = 15 lbs
Total = 210 lbs


PRELOAD CRITERIA

Rear wheel travel, max extension = 120 mm
Sport bike: set preload sag to 20% to 30% of total travel.
Sport bike: set preload sag to 24 mm to 36 mm
Road bike: set preload sag to 30% to 35% of total travel.
Road bike: set preload sag to 36 mm to 42 mm

I'll shoot for 40 mm travel, which should be reasonable comfortable for this commuter.
This is 1/3 of the maximum available travel of 120 mm.


MEASURING SAG

I rigged up a simple apparatus to measure sag on the rear suspension. This involved a FM-Radio antenna, which collapses. This was taped to the rear link-arm, and was positioned to collapse when I later sat on the bike. The resulting gap in the compressed antenna indicated the initial sag. It read 60 to 65 mm. Too much; lets increase preload on shock.

I tried using a C-spanner but it failed to engage the teeth of the shock's rings. However, many tech's apparently use a punch and hammer. That is what I used. After 1 minute of modest and persistent tapping the top ring, it separated from the bottom ring.


SETTING PRELOAD

I marked the bottom ring, then proceeded to drive it to increase the preload. I turned it 4 full revolutions. It appeared that perhaps 2 more revolutions were remaining, available for further preload, but I didn't utilize that extra reserve.

I repeated of my sag test; it indicated the sag had diminished to 40 mm overall. Good.

I relocked the top ring against the bottom ring, which required about four transitions of the mated teeth of the two rings.
 

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W

wildeone

I weight with cloths etc around 240LB what sag should I have?
I have bottom out the rear few times on bumpy road...
 

Skeleton

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I weight with cloths etc around 240LB what sag should I have?
I have bottom out the rear few times on bumpy road...

You should dial in more preload than me. Afterwards, when you sit on bike, it should sag probably 30 mm - for regular roads. If you ride on bumpier roads, etc, than good stiffer, with 20 to 25 mm sag.

Note, I ride normal roads (regarding swales, dips, speed bumps), for which I have never bottomed out the suspension. My preload is set for 40 mm sag. My dressed weight (including tail bag) is about 200 lbs.
 
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W

wildeone

You should dial in more preload than me. Afterwards, when you sit on bike, it should sag probably 30 mm - for regular roads. If you ride on bumpier roads, etc, than good stiffer, with 20 to 25 mm sag.

Note, I ride normal roads (regarding swales, dips, speed bumps), for which I have never bottomed out the suspension. My preload is set for 40 mm sag. My dressed weight (including tail bag) is about 200 lbs.

thanks, I ride more offroads and bumpy roads then normal :)

BTW what did you use for that rear spring from rear wheel mud? looks nice.
 

Skeleton

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That 'mud guard' does a great job of keeping the rear shock coil and piston rod clean, despite riding through wet dirty roads.

It is made from very stiff plastic, about 4 mm thick. I cut it to shape. It is fastened merely with velcro straps; the straps go through holes cut in the mud flap so the flap does slip down. The strap laces through the holes in the bikes plastic under body - you will see the two square slot holes when you check your own bike.

It is important that the flap extends over the swing arm cross arm - when the wheel is completely unsprung! You can only simulate this when the bike is up on a center stand (not side stand). This extra length prevents the mud flap from snagging and buckling on the cross arm.
 

Skeleton

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Working from the kick stand side of the bike, which way to turn for stiffer?

Look down from the sky, the ring must be turned CLOCKWISE to TIGHTEN the spring. This will increase the preload, which is desirable for heavier riders.

Note, there are two rings to turn. The top ring is merely a locking ring. The bottom ring is fused to the shock's body; turning this ring changes the preload. You must always first loosen the locking ring (turned anti-clockwise) first, then you can change the shock's ring. When done adjusting, retighten the locking ring (clockwise).
 
W

wildeone

Look down from the sky, the ring must be turned CLOCKWISE to TIGHTEN the spring. This will increase the preload, which is desirable for heavier riders.

that part to be honest I don't understand, never been working with suspension so forgive me. I would think that for heavier riders the spring should be longer hence we should not tighten it but rather loosen it to have longer travel.
Can you explain it why my assumption is wrong? thanks
 

miw

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Alter 1000km I went to honda for the first check... I asked them, fix the rear suspension to maximum. I want my bike hard. (Actually it won't be too hard)
The original suspension like the one on nc is very cheap... I'm 80kg, and I always run my bike alone... The bike is much better on this ways, doesn't shake as a boat... Pretty cool on straight and turns...
Just try guys...
 
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