I think I'm done Farkeling the NC750x for travel???

melensdad

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Not everything is installed, not everything is even delivered, but I think I'm done.

I think my NC750x is pretty much set for travel. Looking at somewhere between a 2500 and a 6500 mile ride this summer. I know that is a big spread. But plans are for Lake Michigan + Lake Superior circle tour. Those two lakes will be roughly 2500 miles. If we continue Eastbound we could pick up some or all of the other Great Lakes and potentially do a full Great Lakes Circle tour. We need to firm up our travel dates. Our goal is for a leisurely ride, roughly 250 miles per day plus some 'tourist' days. So this planned trip is anywhere from 10 to 30 days depending. Our original plan was a mid-August departure but our daughter may return home from San Jose for a long Labor Day weekend, which would force us to 1) cut the trip short or 2) change the departure date. In any case we are flexible.

Here is the Farkle list:

  • Hepco & Becker side and top case racks.
  • Hepco & Becker GOBI side and top boxes.
  • removable luggage bags for the H&B side boxes
  • LED multi-function license plate frame for added visibility (running, stop, turn, plate illumination)
  • Denali LED front facing Aux lights for added visibility
  • Madstadt windshield
  • Ram Mount (lockable type) with 'Quad Lock' iPhone case for navigation
  • Corbin seat
  • Desert Fox 5 liter fuel bladder
  • Dale's Rack rear seat replacement
  • Gibidi (Cobrra/Nemo2) chain oiler
  • USB outlet in Frunk
  • GoCruise 2 (not sure I actually like it but it is functional, wish I would have purchased the Atlas)
  • Grip Puppies
  • Cramp Buster
  • Replacement brake handle (only because my bike tipped over on my front lawn and broke the OEM brake handle when it hit the grass!)
I did purchase a BEELINE arrow navigation device, but that may or may not arrive anytime soon. It's a Kickstarter gimmick that I wanted to try. If it works it will be a perfect KISS navigation aid. If not then I waisted about $100.

There are plenty of other accessories for travel that were purchased but are not actually part of, or installed on the bike. Things like the Cardo Palktalk Slim headsets that work with the SCENIC navigation software that is installed on the iPhone and will be used for route directions. Also various cable locks, straps, dry bags, etc.


There are many other things that I believe I could add but I'm not sure they would increase actual utility without also increasing weight. I did consider adding engine guards, skid plates, radiator guard, etc but opted against it. Some of the guards would be nice, and if we were taking more gravel roads then I would have added those. My wife really prefers to stay on asphalt so, in a nod to her preferences, skipping the guards that, IN THEORY, will not really be needed for where we plan to ride.

Also purchased real rain gear for the trip. For local rides we don't really need it because we can avoid riding in most rain situations pretty easily. Upgraded all the armor to CE Level 2 in all the riding gear during the process, from knee to elbow to shoulder to back.

Actually purchased pretty much 2 of all the above. My wife rides an NC700x. She and I pretty much got exactly the same stuff on the bikes except she has GIVI side cases and no top case. She doesn't get the Corbin seat either, didn't want it. Her bike is lowered with a Soupy's lowering link + adjustable kickstand. I also installed LED lights into her GIVI V37 cases instead of installing a multi-function license plate frame. She is not getting a Dale's Rack either since we intend to have the dry bag strapped to my bike for trips.
 
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mooseonbass

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I did purchase a BEELINE arrow navigation device, but that may or may not arrive anytime soon. It's a Kickstarter gimmick that I wanted to try. If it works it will be a perfect KISS navigation aid. If not then I waisted about $100.
I am also eagerly awaiting my Beeline Moto. Please let the us know when yours arrives, I'll do the same. I don't want to watch a map and refuse to put my phone in my ear so this seems like the perfect solution.
 

melensdad

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Corbin seat arrived while I was out of town.
Dale's Rack arrived the day I returned home.

Installed both yesterday, but we had lightning storms so didn't ride.

The only thing I'm waiting to arrive, so I can install, is the chain oiler.

Took it on a 100 mile test ride today. Corbin recommends a 1000 mile break in period. Based on 100 miles in the seat I have 2 major observations.

1) This seat is already 10, maybe 100, times more comfortable than the stock Honda seat.
2) The leather surface is slippery. Under medium braking I slide forward. Not a huge deal. But it's just something I noticed. My Rev-it pants have seat grippers on them and they didn't do anything to hold me in place on the leather surface of the Corbin.
 

Rapturee

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Roger that Bob, brake hard once and Chuck and the boys will be on top of the Frunk(haha)! I too had that same issue, i applied several coats of Leather conditioner and that did seem to help. :{)

Pics too please, let's see them Farkles buddy!
 

spads25

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So this planned trip is anywhere from 10 to 30 days depending.
My goal is to get to a point in my life where I can take an open ended trip like this. Must be nice. Have fun, enjoy it for the rest of us who are stuck at work [emoji12]



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

melensdad

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No more pictures until I can get my Photobucket account to work again. It says I have lots of space available (over 1 gig) but won't let me upload because my storage is full???


My goal is to get to a point in my life where I can take an open ended trip like this. Must be nice. Have fun, enjoy it for the rest of us who are stuck at work [emoji12]
Retire young and travel!
 

Rapturee

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Exactly!!, That has been my plan for years. I have had far too many friends/relatives that waited too long(IMHO) to "retire" and go enjoy life, travel, ride or whatever. They all died or got seriously sick and then were unable to do all of those things they had planned for so long of their loves to finally be able to do!!

So, "Note to Self", start doing those things now, early in life, with the ones you love and don't wait, as there will never be a "perfect time" in most of our lives. So February of last year I found a smokin' deal on a NC700 manual and bought it! And i have been putting farkles on it(as funds allow) and a lot of miles on it ever since. I too have it right where i want it and really "need" nothing else for it. It is a blast to ride and Ride I do! :{)

So, get out and RIDE!! :{P
 

melensdad

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... I too have it right where i want it and really "need" nothing else for it. It is a blast to ride and Ride I do! :{)

So, get out and RIDE!! :{P
I'm sure I could add crash bars, radiator and engine guards, skid plate, etc. All add weight that I don't want. I'm not looking to make a 475 pound bike into a 600 pounder. Its heavy enough with filled cargo boxes and a duffle across the top.

It's the way I want it. I don't begrudge anyone who wants to add a whole bunch more than I added or wants to leave it stock. To each his own. We ride our own rides.

As for getting out and riding. We went out this morning for breakfast. 66 miles for a grilled cheese sandwich at a farm to table restaurant :)
 

dduelin

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The thing with boats and motorcycles is that they are never done, at least for me. I see things other people have done and get ideas.
 

melensdad

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The thing with boats and motorcycles is that they are never done, at least for me. I see things other people have done and get ideas.
I'd like to figure out how to take off some weight from the bike.
 

rippin209

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The thing with boats and motorcycles is that they are never done, at least for me. I see things other people have done and get ideas.
Or some gizmo gets an upgrade

USMEI Dual QC3.0 USB Charger Socket with Voltmeter, 36W Waterproof Quick Charge 3.0 Power Outlet Adapter for 12V/24V Car Boat Marine Motorcycle ATV RV Campers Tractors Truck Golf-Cart etc https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07QXT4ZQ2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_xuPhDbRGCW815

I just saw this and ordered one, I've already got a dual USB outlet hooked up in my frunk but no volt meter and it's not Qualcomm 3 charging speed so I'm upgrading, a small cheap example but the same could be applied to more then a few farkles.

P.s. I might hook the new outlet up by the handlebars instead of in the frunk
 

melensdad

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Or some gizmo gets an upgrade ...
To each his own.

I do enjoy modern conveniences.

But I really want to minimize complications. With the possible exception of a decal or religious token to personalize my bike, I want to keep the mechanicals as stock as possible and the add-ons as weight effective and functional as possible without adding much of anything more than necessary.

My 12 volt accessory socket uses the same quick connect as my battery tender. My aux LED lights (front and rear) tap into existing wiring so no added switches needed to turn them on/off and being LED they use power efficiently. I want no more connections to my electrical system than is absolutely necessary. Minimal is better. The pannier boxes/top box are light weight and function; sure I color match painted them to make them look better but that is just rattle can paint. Chain oiler is mechanical. Navigation is my iPhone. Etc...

I did order a Beeline, its a stand-alone simple directional unit, looks to be dead simple and its inexpensive. Simple as it is, of all the things for my bike, this is the one thing that seems to break my own rules.

I want things to work simply. I want them lightweight but strong and functional. Again, just my preferences. As a long distance hiker I know that I need to walk my own walk and someone else needs to walk their walk their own way. Bikes are the same. I ride my own ride and feel everyone else has the right to ride their own ride. No judgement. Just explaining where I come from.
 

rippin209

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To each his own.

I do enjoy modern conveniences.

But I really want to minimize complications. With the possible exception of a decal or religious token to personalize my bike, I want to keep the mechanicals as stock as possible and the add-ons as weight effective and functional as possible without adding much of anything more than necessary.

My 12 volt accessory socket uses the same quick connect as my battery tender. My aux LED lights (front and rear) tap into existing wiring so no added switches needed to turn them on/off and being LED they use power efficiently. I want no more connections to my electrical system than is absolutely necessary. Minimal is better. The pannier boxes/top box are light weight and function; sure I color match painted them to make them look better but that is just rattle can paint. Chain oiler is mechanical. Navigation is my iPhone. Etc...

I did order a Beeline, its a stand-alone simple directional unit, looks to be dead simple and its inexpensive. Simple as it is, of all the things for my bike, this is the one thing that seems to break my own rules.

I want things to work simply. I want them lightweight but strong and functional. Again, just my preferences. As a long distance hiker I know that I need to walk my own walk and someone else needs to walk their walk their own way. Bikes are the same. I ride my own ride and feel everyone else has the right to ride their own ride. No judgement. Just explaining where I come from.
I get the idea of that and can see some of the perks to sticking to that.

My electrical skills are limited but my modifications have been fairly simple and triple checked for quality after I'm done

My auxiliary lights are also hooked up to the OEM accessory harness

I've hooked up a fuse block (direct to the battery) and that powers my frunks interior light, cigarette lighter and dual USB outlet (the currently installed one) I just recently installed new mirrors with built in turn signals and was able to simply hook them into the existing connector.

I'm thinking of hooking up that new outlet near the handle bars to power my phone charger (plan on building a phone mount with wireless charging) and I'll hook that new outlet to the accessory wiring harness so there's no power draw while parked

My NC is my commuter my balance of comfort vs reliability is pretty much 50/50, I wouldn't go for a trip (outside my 60 miles each way commute) without thousands miles to make sure my mods wouldn't leave me stranded for some reason

I plan on hooking up a plug for a heated vest/ a.c. Helmet and then I'm done with the electrical, as you said different styles different goals.

If I wanted a rock solid reliable ride I'd be less willing to mod but that's still no guaranty, another guy on the forum is sidelined right now due to factory electrical failing on an NC he bought 2 months ago so nothing is infallible
 

melensdad

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About 200 miles on the Corbin seat.

I did notice, while far more comfortable, it is wide enough that my 33" inseam no longer has extra room between body & leather seat when I am standing it at a stop light. With the stock seat I could flat foot the bike and there was enough room down there for a hint of daylight or a light breeze to get through. With the Corbin I'm still in contact with the seat. Not saying it is pressed against me, but there is no room for daylight either.
 

melensdad

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CORBIN SEAT UPDATE:

Well over 500 miles on the Corbin seat. After a couple hundred miles I put 1/4" spacers under the front to lift the front. That was like magic. The slope "problem" is gone; and this is really a subjective problem as many people have no issue with the slope and some of us complain about it. The sliding forward issue with the slippery seat is not a problem anymore either. Reducing that tiny bit of slope with just a 1/4" of lift made a really comfortable seat even better.


MADSTADT windscreen update:

I commented once that I wondered if the Madstadt screens were TOO EFFECTIVE and I believe that, if properly sized and dialed in, they may well be too good. We have them installed on both of our bikes. They are sized exactly as per the Madstadt sizing chart on their website, that was done after confirming, via a string of emails, that it was the best option for us.

Mine is 2" taller than my wife's. I think (but am not 100% sure) that mine is an 18" and her's is a 16".

What I can tell you after riding both bikes for 60+ miles each today (90 degrees & 80% humidity) is that I don't get a lot of airflow behind my windscreen and even with a mesh jacket I can bake in the heat. I traded bikes and rode her bike, and immediately noticed far more airflow. In fact at 30 mph I was comfortable behind her with enough breeze flowing through my mesh to keep me from sweating. I did notice a bit of buffeting on my head at 60mph when I had my visor up. Visor down seemed to eliminate the buffeting. And it was very mild buffeting at 60mph.

I guess my message is that if you live in a hot/humid area and ride then consider going 1 size SMALLER and you will get more airflow to keep your body cooler. If you ride in cooler weather then you may want to stick with the recommended sizes.


NEMO 2 Chain Oiler

Installed and working. Install time was 30 minutes for each, including clean up time. I mounted on the right handlebar to the brake fluid reservoir; it did require that I use 1 washer as a spacer to allow for it to be installed without coming in contact with the reservoir. Hiding the hose behind the body panels and keeping it away from hot parts of the engine was an easy task. Regardless of brand, make sure to periodically check the drip tube to make sure it is dripping where you want it to drip.


GO CRUISE 2

Still not a big fan of this thing. Probably should have spent the money for the Atlas. Not that any throttle lock is going to work really well, but I find the GoCruise2 design to be sort of a pain to set.
 

dduelin

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GoCruise 2 is a bit of a pain to set.

GoCruise (1) is not a pain to use, works great.
 

melensdad

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Just ordered an Atlas throttle lock

I'm fed up with the GoCruise 2, part of the reason may be the fact that my brake level is not a factory brake lever, so I don't have the same notch in mine that the GoCruise type units fit into. Part of the reason is that it strains my hand to engage and I fiddle with getting it set for a long time before I'm reasonably happy. Once set it actually works, but it takes way too long for me to get it set to my satisfaction. Atlas sets easy and adjusts easy.

Anyone want a GoCruise 2 unit? I actually have 2 of them. One is still in the package.
 
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