How will modern bikes age?

BFair

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I just finished a mechanical restoration on a 49 year old CB175 Honda twin. Timed and set ignition points with a light bulb, valves were in spec with 13,000 miles. The charging system needed converted to a regulator rectifier unit, 4 wires easy enough, carb clean, rebuild and tune. Chased 3 oil leaks to 2 perished gaskets and a pinhole puncture in the case from a to long case bolt.

Bike revs to red line, makes rates power, and brings the rider back to 1971.

My question is this, how is a bike with computer electronics controlling engine management, fueling, braking, suspension, and traction, going to age 49 years from now? I could tear out most of the wiring harnesses on this 175 and it would run the same!
 

TigerDude

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Poorly. Eventually, the cost of a new ECU will be more than the value of the bike. A rebuild will involve all new electronics. This is what makes supercars from the 80s cost $3000 - they are one ABS control unit failure away from the junkyard.
 

BFair

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Your exactly right! High end cars go for cheap. If your good with a multimeter you can fix them. High end bikes should be no different.

We will be taking 20k adventure bikes and putting carbs back on them. No exotic fuel pumps, or computer, needed.
 

Griff

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My 30 year old NX could easily be sidelined by its little black box and that is 89. Afaik these items can be repaired after a fashion and they can still be got new at great expense. However thankfully a company in Eastern Europe will manufacture to order at reasonable prices and from reports to date on various elderley bikes they work well.
 
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670cc

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I understand the appeal of working on the old, simple motorcycle components with your eyes and hands. But when I think back to the finicky nature and relatively poor reliability of 1970s cars and motorcycles, I have no desire to return to those dark ages. Today I push the start button on the NC and instantly ride off with a perfectly running, reliable engine In all conditions. No way would I want to go back to carbs, manual choke, breaker points, weak electrical systems, oil leaks, etc. It’s even crazy that in 2020 we still need to mess with chains for final drive.
 
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Congrats on bringing the old CB back from the brink and don't forget about the tires, 50 year old rubber is less than supple. I totally agree with the above post by 670cc, I'll keep modern EFI for my daily commuter.

How well modern bikes will age? - My first thought is about the plastics used on everything these days. Good luck finding a ~50 year old plastic handle, knob, or switch that isn't just as brittle as those old rubber tires.
 

BFair

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Plastic are an issue and degrade at a somewhat predictable rate. Fortunately there are less on the mechanics, engine, cooling system, than on modern cars. This is a plus for bikes.

Granted we get great reliability to a point. I repaired a "modern bike" on the road. Oil light came on shut bike down.....good. Disconnected oil sending wire, defaulted to running on one cylinder. Reconnected oil sending wire good to go. He would have been looking for a tow if the unit failed again. Rode with him til he got home, could have failed on him at any time. Reliable at a cost, different kind of finicky I guess.
 

BFair

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BMW announced ActiveTG2SFJFBQ5HXTBGOK2NZUN3DDA.jpg32DJB26YYBHUZKNMO7CJ3H73JU.jpg Cruise Control.....who's going to fix that?
 

BFair

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Next will be autobrake. Take all that stuff off you would have a nice bike. I'd like to see a survey on what is actually used on a regular basis. I have a computer controlled cruise control on my Honda ST1300. I only use it if I want to stretch, scratch, or zip.
 

670cc

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Next might be (gasp) an automatic transmission!!! Or, antilock brakes!!!

We are free to buy what we want, or forego buying anything new if we like what we already have. Let the market decide what new toys are successful, or not.

Instead of electronic nanny toys, I’d rather see motorcycles catch up to autombiles in regards to maintenance intervals. Let’s see valve adjustments and coolant changes at 150,000 miles. Let’s see tires last 50,000 miles. Let’s see a final drive that needs no attention for 60,000 miles, or maybe even for the life of the vehicle! Instead, we are told to oil the chain every 500 miles?
 

Janus

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I'm dumping my old 2000 Passat at a junkyard tomorrow because there are so many electrical gremlins it's not even funny.

Multiple plastic parts have either disintegrated or broken. Like my glove box handle. Or my window rolling mechanism. I tore the panels apart (made the NC feel like a breeze by comparison) and discovered the part where the glass rests shattered. No more going up.

I would be so happy to own an air cooled, all mechanical car. No power anything. Maybe steering. But I've had more than enough of perfectly good engines, trannies, and chassis' being scrapped for the burden of electrical looms.

Great design is removing unnecessary parts. BMW is doing the opposite of that. Maybe it's convenient, but maybe it promotes complacency.

I will never forgive Volkswagen for ruining cars that used to be easy to work on. I will not be buying a bike that is like a Volkswagen either. If I can't repair it— I don't want it
 

MZ5

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It seems like the thread has turned from "how will today's bikes age" to "I hate technology younger than I am." LOL!
 

showkey

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Add Active cruise, lane keep, active braking, vehicle stability, power windows, 8 air bags, climate control, Near zero emissions, hands free audio, Apple play, is how the basic eco box gets to $25k

same applies to motorcycles.........
 

halfSpinDoctor

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I'm very <grumpy old manish> with cars. I drive a 2007 Civic - the perfect year! Why, do you ask? Last model year for Honda that does not have TPMS*. Also no backup camera, last model generation (8th gen) to have hydraulic steering instead of EPS (I like the feel better). Still has ABS. Just a good point for safety and convenience features without all of the bells and whistles that may break over time.

*I do think TPMS is a good feature for the plebs who do not know or care to know anything about cars, but for someone line me who is happy to check with a $2 tyre gauge ever couple of drives, I'd rather not deal with the nagging messages in cold weather, the need to get it re-programmed by a dealer (or buy a $100+ tool) every time I swap summer/winter tyres, etc, etc.
 

670cc

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I'm very <grumpy old manish> with cars. I drive a 2007 Civic - the perfect year! Why, do you ask? Last model year for Honda that does not have TPMS*. Also no backup camera, last model generation (8th gen) to have hydraulic steering instead of EPS (I like the feel better). Still has ABS. Just a good point for safety and convenience features without all of the bells and whistles that may break over time.

*I do think TPMS is a good feature for the plebs who do not know or care to know anything about cars, but for someone line me who is happy to check with a $2 tyre gauge ever couple of drives, I'd rather not deal with the nagging messages in cold weather, the need to get it re-programmed by a dealer (or buy a $100+ tool) every time I swap summer/winter tyres, etc, etc.
Until an alternative for pneumatic car tires comes about, TPMS has become a necessity. Without it, half the cars on the road would probably be driving around with 10 PSI in their tires. I think of other members in my extended family, probably representative of “average” car owners, and I don’t picture them checking tire pressure every couple of drives. Maybe every couple of years, if even that.

I was just told recently by a relative that the dashboard tire light came on in his/her SUV. So he/she took it to the dealer and was happy that the dealer was able to “fix“ the “problem“ right away.

Automobiles have become largely, but not entirely, maintenance free. Owners have become complacent about maintenance that still should be done routinely.
 

BFair

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I believe the tire sensors came about after the Ford Explorer rollovers. Not a bad thing. Good for touring bikes where heavier loads are prevelent. Light bike owners need to be more connected with maintenance.

Totaly agree with chain life and oiling. I like chains due to the efficiency they offer. Less power loss compared to shaft drive on smaller displacement bikes. Belt drives are a good alternative but make gearing changes and off road riding problematic. Chains also keep the bike narrow, look at the mass on the rear drive of a BMW. (Not knocking BMW I own 2. ) Honda's are much lighter and simple in there design.

I would like a simple indicator light for the kick stand
down position.
 
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