First video: Sena Prism Tube helmet cam w/ mic

GoRovers

Member
Last week I bought the Sena Prism Tube helmet camera and created my first 5-minute video with it. Mounting options for a camera onto a modular (flip-up) motorcycle helmet like my Nolan N-104 are limited. (Top mount is impossible.) So I used 3M tape and mounted the "Tube" to the right/lower side of the helmet. The mic cable isn't long enough to attach to inside of the N-104's articulating chin guard, so I stuck in on the bottom chin padding, which means wind noise is increased a bit. The Tube also has a single small in-helmet speaker that tells me the camera is on, off, out of memory, etc.

Sena-Prism-Tube-helmet-cam-w600.jpg

This "Riding with Lee: Getting to Ortega" video is a prequel to a GoPro video taken two weeks ago by fellow NC700X riding buddy Steve (with the camera fix-mounted to his windshield) of our ride up Ortega Highway to Lake Mathews here in Southern California. This video includes my ride down Santiago Canyon, Cook's Corner, and Live Oak Canyon to the intersection of Antonio and Ortega, where Steve and I later ride again to Lake Mathews.

In this commentary-filled, occasionally funny video you'll see me pass gas-powered Porsches, you'll hear me critique the shifting style of the driver of a Ferrari F355 Berlinetta, you'll learn how to trigger a green light while on a bike, and you'll learn how to make a delicious lentil soup. (Okay, one of those things isn't true.) I edited the video down from 60 minutes to 5 minutes using Sony Vegas software and licensed music.

[video=youtube_share;8Hc4IEhp5Jw]https://youtu.be/8Hc4IEhp5Jw[/video]
 

happy

Site Supporter
Last week I bought the Sena Prism Tube helmet camera and created my first 5-minute video with it. Mounting options for a camera onto a modular (flip-up) motorcycle helmet like my Nolan N-104 are limited. (Top mount is impossible.) So I used 3M tape and mounted the "Tube" to the right/lower side of the helmet. The mic cable isn't long enough to attach to inside of the N-104's articulating chin guard, so I stuck in on the bottom chin padding, which means wind noise is increased a bit. The Tube also has a single small in-helmet speaker that tells me the camera is on, off, out of memory, etc.

View attachment 35329

This "Riding with Lee: Getting to Ortega" video is a prequel to a GoPro video taken two weeks ago by fellow NC700X riding buddy Steve (with the camera fix-mounted to his windshield) of our ride up Ortega Highway to Lake Mathews here in Southern California. This video includes my ride down Santiago Canyon, Cook's Corner, and Live Oak Canyon to the intersection of Antonio and Ortega, where Steve and I later ride again to Lake Mathews.

In this commentary-filled, occasionally funny video you'll see me pass gas-powered Porsches, you'll hear me critique the shifting style of the driver of a Ferrari F355 Berlinetta, you'll learn how to trigger a green light while on a bike, and you'll learn how to make a delicious lentil soup. (Okay, one of those things isn't true.) I edited the video down from 60 minutes to 5 minutes using Sony Vegas software and licensed music.

[video=youtube_share;8Hc4IEhp5Jw]https://youtu.be/8Hc4IEhp5Jw[/video]
Your road intersection is sooooo huge!!! OMG!

Sent from my MI MAX using Tapatalk
 

Hank

Active Member
The sound is excellent. The camera is showing part of your helmet and face shield.

Sensors at intersections are based on magnetic readings, not weight.

The more steel in the vehicle, the more likely the sensor is to work.
The magnestism level can be changed by the highway people.

There used to be problems here in Oklahoma, but they have changed the settings.
 
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GoRovers

Member
Sensors at intersections are based on magnetic readings, not weight. The more steel in the vehicle, the more likely the sensor is to work. The magnestism level can be changed by the highway people.
True...a traffic light's inductive coil sensors are affected by the mass (not weight) of a vehicle. However, lowering the kickstand so that it touches ground near the inductive coil line increases the chances the coil will sense the bike's mass. It simply reduces the distance between the field generated by the coils and the bike's mass, enabling the coils to react to the (now closer) conductive metal.
 
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