Beginner just test rode 3 bikes today, turning questions on the NC

the Ferret

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Regarding tire pressure, I usually run 35-36 in front and back. No real reason to run 42 psi in the rear unless you are riding 2 up with loads of luggage. Just my opinion, nothing more.

When running solo on my other bikes I'll run +2 front and -2 rear ie" 38 F and 40 R for a bike that calls for 36/42. I feel the +2 in the front seems to help with preventing dishing/scalloping/cupping, and the -2 rear makes the ride a little softer. I'll bump the rear 2# for a passenger or a lot of luggage. At least that's my thinking on it.

On another note, your preferred tire pressure is really only as good as the accuracy of your tire gauge. Unless you have your tire gauge calibrated on occasion it could be a couple of pounds off either way. I use a digital tire gauge (that will add or bleed air depending on how far the lever is squeezed) but it measures 2# different than my brother's same model digital tire gauge...both supposedly guaranteed accurate within 1/4 pound of pressure lol

BTW the sticker on my truck calls for 32# but the guys at the tire shop I go to always put in 35# when I have them rotated lol.
 

Samanjo

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When I first took my NC for a test ride, going around corners needed a lot of input from me as the handlebars felt heavy.
I even confronted the seller about this and he could not give me a satisfactory explanation.
I managed to even negotiate a price drop due to this as I was convinced the steering head bearings were worn.
When I got home with the bike I discovered that the pressure of both tyres were very low....I inflated to the correct pressures and the bike handled perfectly.
 

TacomaJD

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Do you find you eat through tires a little faster? Lower pressures are usually associated with earlier wear (but give a more comfortable ride).
I never run anything above those pressures, so I have no other data to compare it to in terms of mileage per set. I ride twisties hard, grip has always been more important than longevity to me. 35/35 is a good street pressure for aggressive riding and still be plenty enough air for tire longevity, in my opinion. But others' results may vary. 42 just sounds like a lot in the rear tire. I have an 850 lb Kawi Vulcan Nomad 1600 bagger I ride on long trips, Avon Cobra tires, and run around 38/38 or 39/39 pressures in it. Even loaded down with luggage and my fiance on the back. Still get 10-11k miles out of the Avon Cobras running those pressures, on a much heavier bike than the NC.

My other NC (track bike) runs 24 in rear and 30 in front, but that's a bit of a different application. I am running the Michelin Power Cup Evos on it. Michelin's track pressure chart says to run the rear at 22 cold, but most bikes that run those tires weigh a good 100-150 lbs less than the DCT NC, so I upped it a couple psi cold pressure for a little extra stability out of the gate.
 

AVG1940

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Rode professionally, 10 hours a day for years. Got to know what a pound and a half difference felt like. Usually ran a couple pounds high because of all the low speed maneuvering while in an urban environment...liked the crisp(er) handling it added with a mostly heavily loaded motor. These days (retired) I can confidently say it's not that big a deal to me. I run at recommended pressures (Honda, not the tire). Demo ride with BMW on new bike releases and always put the pressures spot on. It's what the suspension is tuned to. I guess my point is I mostly ride to spec, with small changes for specific missions. I'm just not that great a rider to worry about small changes. Luckily I am good enough to just "ride to" most bikes characteristics. I know that sounds super arrogant, but adjusting to different bikes and specs makes you a better rider in general. Be safe and just go ride, Sparkynuts.
 
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Hank

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36 / 42 is recommended.
I like how the bike handles with the Michelin pilot road. I wore out two sets of 4s. Now on the newer 5, which is designed slightly differently but I still like it. (The “5” actually is not called “pilot” but I can’t break myself of calling it that.)
To the OP I would say this a mild, easy to ride bike, with some speed when you need it. I think it would fit your needs well.
 

Makingitwork6999

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Maybe I should throw in my 2 cents here. What happened on the original part of this thread was typical of a bike with a steep and abrupt street tire shape and a suspension sprung light for a nose dive into a corner. My bike did exactly this with a worn set of fork springs and a Michelin pilot tire. In fact, one of the springs was shorter than the other when fully decompressed.

This very same problem went away with a different set of tires and a newer stiffer suspension with proper dampening.

You may find others saying the exact same thing. Yes. The NC can behave that way. And it is a function of your weight, the tires, and the forks. It can also behave very differently with an Avon av53 trail tire or a Bridgestone trail tire.

Trail tires are often just as good as street performance tires for everyday riding. You will find the steering and cornering behavior quite different.

Tires now have different compounds on the sides and center of the tire. One tire may dive into a corner quite abruptly while a different tire will have a more mild and controllable behavior. You do not have to be an avid racer to feel this. If you noticed it, you are not insane. You are feeling the right sensations. You have tire awareness.
 

drdubb

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So many things make a difference. I currently have two motorcycles, if I go directly from one to the other, I can hardly ride whichever bike was second. I once had a 750 Honda Nighthawk and a DR650. If I went from the DR to the nighthawk, I would almost crash the Nighthawk.
 

Makingitwork6999

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So many things make a difference. I currently have two motorcycles, if I go directly from one to the other, I can hardly ride whichever bike was second. I once had a 750 Honda Nighthawk and a DR650. If I went from the DR to the nighthawk, I would almost crash the Nighthawk.
I had a small collection of bikes. Switching from radically different bikes without issue can be difficult. For example, going from a type 1 Vmax to a Rebel 500 to an XR650 to an NC DCT. I still reach for the clutch and shifter on my foot and left hand. Of course, with the DCT, the left side of my body is along for the ride. I sometimes over-tense up or throw my body weight around. The Vmax and the Vultus require some extreme muscle movements. The rebel 500 could be ridden by simply using the force. The NC can be ridden using a variety of tactics or none at all.

The Vmax still has scarred my brain fairly badly. I still sometimes clench my teeth and butt cheeks right before I throttle up without cause. Then I remember I am riding the NC and not some great metal beast that is ripping my arms out of their sockets. Sometimes a play a song in my helmet that takes me back to those moments.

 

670cc

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So many things make a difference. I currently have two motorcycles, if I go directly from one to the other, I can hardly ride whichever bike was second. I once had a 750 Honda Nighthawk and a DR650. If I went from the DR to the nighthawk, I would almost crash the Nighthawk.
Not to brag, but once I have had a bike for awhile, the nature of it becomes burned into my brain. I switch from bicycle to 50cc scooter to 250cc scooter to 250cc dual sport to NC700X to 1832cc Goldwing with a passenger and never have any problem adjusting to the differences. About half the bikes are automatic, half are manual. I‘ll pick up a new Zero electric bike soon, which will be a totally new animal, and I don’t expect any problems adding it to the mix. Maybe because I ride them all often, I don’t forget how each one operates.

One thing I did do is switch all my bicycle brake controls so the front brake lever is on the right, like motorcycles. That way the front brake controls are consistent on all two wheelers.
 

dduelin

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Not to brag, but once I have had a bike for awhile, the nature of it becomes burned into my brain. I switch from bicycle to 50cc scooter to 250cc scooter to 250cc dual sport to NC700X to 1832cc Goldwing with a passenger and never have any problem adjusting to the differences. Half the bikes are automatic, half are manual. I‘ll pick up a new Zero electric bike soon, which will be a totally new animal, and I don’t expect any problems adding it to the mix. Maybe because I ride them all often, I don’t forget how each one operates.
This is my experience as well but I have noticed than if I don’t ride a clutched bike for a couple of weeks I notice I lose some polish on the shifting. Rev matching mostly, finesse skills. I don’t forget how to shift of course, just the 1 or 2% stuff.
 

Janus

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When I go from my DRZ to my NC I feel weird for about a block. The difference is sitting-on or sitting-in, and throttle response. Not much changes.

On my C50 Boulevard it is just a different way to sit. I like moving from one bike to another, it keeps me sharper. Can't be as lazy in terms of attentiveness
 
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