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kebrider

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I have missed having an NC in the garage since I traded my 13 700 (6sp) in on my Tiger Explorer. Unlike most (I suspect) I use the NC nearly exclusively for weekend sport riding. I don't claim to be, nor aspire to be, searching for max speed, I just want to have a great time. Experts may suggest the NC lacks excitement but I respectfully disagree. My KTM 790 Duke was certainly faster and better handling and it was specifically designed and engineered to excel at handling mountain roads at speed. Better power, brakes, lean sensitive ABS and TC, and ground clearance there is no doubt the KTM is a the quicker from A to B. Throw in traffic, speed limits and a pinch of concern for the safety of others and the gap narrows considerably.

I now have a 19 NC750x Non-DCT and only one 200 mile run through the mountains so far. The bike has been significantly refined from the 700 I enjoyed. Power and extra rev ceiling gives the bike a new, more substantial feel and the suspension has a much improved plushness. Like all my bikes it will get a steady diet of 400 mile days in the mountains of TN, GA, SC, NC, KY, and VA. We'll see if it can live up to the legend that was my NC700x.

KEB
 
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kebrider

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Slow or fast is not my most important metric for a motorcycle. Comfortable riding position, an engaging mechanical feel, reliability, durability, serviceability, entertaining corner speed and light, neutral steering are the recipe for a good time. I have disappeared from many top tier sport bikes with the likes of NC700s, CB500s, CRF250Ls, ST1300s and DRZ400s on the technical mountain roads in my area. There are riders that can probably disappear from me on slower bikes than mine. Fast enough is subjective and it is a bit of a moving target. Fun and satisfying is more consistent so finding the roads your bike excels on safely is as important as the machine itself.

The group I ride with repeats a well known movie line from Christmas Vacation all the time when people ask us what kind of bikes we passed them on: "Does it really matter Eddie"? We can get caught up in the machines and overlook the people. My favorite NC700x story will always be of the guys that spent a weekend chasing me on their V-Stroms and went home and bought NC700's. The next year we see each other at Deals Gap and they said were very disappointed with the bikes and dying to find out what I did to the engine in mine to make it so fast.

KEB
 

dduelin

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Hey Kimball,

Welcome back! I recently sold my 2015 DCT and bought another BMW RT. I might be back on a NC700/750 at some point as I really enjoyed 65,000 miles between the 2012 and the 2015 but for now I'm digging the RT and Goldwing. My favorite story is almost hitting you when you pulled out in front of me at the intersection of US129 and Foothills Parkway. Riding your 2012 with Cogent Dynamic suspension convinced me to upgrade mine.
 

TacomaJD

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Awesome! I want a new 2020 NC to add to the stable bad!

Question on the rpms...I read the rev limiter has been upped from 6250 to 7500 rpms from the 700 to the 750, but on the tachometer on 750's, it still shows a redline of 6250 rpms. Looked at the 2020 at the dealer the other day and noticed it.

I've never ridden the 750, but does it just keep revving past the redline and hit the limiter at 7500?
 

670cc

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On the 700, the peak horsepower RPM has already been reached before the rev limiter kicks in. I believe the 750 makes peak power at about the same spot. So even though the new higher rev limit allows you to continue reving, the power is already falling off and you might as well be shifting anyway.
 

TacomaJD

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On the 700, the peak horsepower RPM has already been reached before the rev limiter kicks in. I believe the 750 makes peak power at about the same spot. So even though the new higher rev limit allows you to continue reving, the power is already falling off and you might as well be shifting anyway.

Totally understand, just trying to figure out how it works, since they supposedly increased the rev limitations yet the tachometer redlines in the same spot as previous models.
 

kebrider

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Hey Kimball,

Welcome back! I recently sold my 2015 DCT and bought another BMW RT. I might be back on a NC700/750 at some point as I really enjoyed 65,000 miles between the 2012 and the 2015 but for now I'm digging the RT and Goldwing. My favorite story is almost hitting you when you pulled out in front of me at the intersection of US129 and Foothills Parkway. Riding your 2012 with Cogent Dynamic suspension convinced me to upgrade mine.

Thanks Dave. It was not so much you hitting me as I came off the Foothills Parkway it was more me seeing an NC in the flesh for the very first time! My other ride is 2017 BMW R1200R so I can understand a Boxer as a fun substitute for an NC. Next time you are in the area drop me a line if you have time and you can demo the 750. I have told you enough how different the 750 engine is but you can decide for yourself with a run through the mountains. 7/10 of a second quicker thru 1/4 mile and 7 mph increase in speed taller gearing is one metric to describe the difference between bike. The improved refinement of the entire bike is remarkable but the turbine feel of acceleration uphill from 80 to 99 mph is so unlike (and impossible on) my old 700 I consider them different bikes.

Good to hear from you Dave
 

kebrider

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Totally understand, just trying to figure out how it works, since they supposedly increased the rev limitations yet the tachometer redlines in the same spot as previous models.

Which is exactly like every other bike made, so you get a chance to shift before the rev limiter. Dare I say the NC is now "normal".
 
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