2021 NC750X Suspension Travel Question

mzflorida

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Thank you all very much. I've learned a lot.

  • 2021 NC750 X may or may not have DBV forks that manage the compression (smooth the ride) by responding to the pressures or stress that is presented. (Honda did acknowledge the receipt of my email and promised a response)
  • DBV suspensions can respond better through more accurate metering of oil flow based on hydraulic pressures presented
    • HondaProKevin responded to my question and said DBVS are being included in the USA version (messenger only, cannot confirm as fact)
  • On rough roads, longer travel suspension may perform better than shorter travel suspension for shock absorption (with caveats)
  • Longer travel suspension may present issues for [tame tarmac riders like me who never venture beyond a gravel parking lot] such as wallowing in curves or turns
  • Either the 4.9 or 5.9 suspension will likely be adequate for riders like me
    • Consensus is that longer is probably better (perhaps more versatile and comfortable), but each with their own set of issues
      • Even though it may feel like you are bottoming on a modern Honda suspension, odds are you are not
  • Suspension upgrades will cost about ~$1k, front and rear (emulators and shock) DIY
Thanks to everyone. I'm grateful for all the contributions added to this discussion. I hope to be able to return the favor sometime. I am leaning more toward the 2021 but not fully committed. I can mod the suspension if needed. Many of the other features are very appealing to me and I can't add those. But, if a sweet deal on 18 DCT came up (partial to red) I might have to jump on it. There is one in Tampa right now that caught my eye.
 

the Ferret

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Good takeaway

be interested in Honda's response about the forks if you would be so kind as to share
 

mzflorida

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I have another question. Sorry for belaboring. The suspension travel being reduced for MY 2021 is a matter of fact. So, if they do include the DBV suspension, could the flow of hydraulic fluid through the shims or reeds lead to bottoming out whereas in the fixed orifice configuration it could not or would be less likely? Another question; would a DBV lead to a reduced likelihood of a fork seal rupture?

This is not factoring into my decision-making process; just curious.
 

MalcolmReynolds

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My take away in this thread is that even though the US finally started to receive the 750 we still didn't get the upgraded suspension parts that other markets have. That is disappointing. Honda US has consistently held back on useful and meaningful updates that other markets have gotten. It really stinks.
 

mzflorida

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That was the tutorial I recalled and mentioned earlier in this thread. Dave, did you add preload adjusters on the bike and why or why not? Next is an engineering question. Would the fork oil retain viscosity longer with the added ports and enlarging the original ports? Pure curiosity but my thought is the increase in flow decreases resistance and pressure lowering overall temperature and extending the life/performance of the hydraulic fluid. Sorry to give you a glimpse of the rabbit holes my thoughts cascade through every day.
 

dduelin

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That was the tutorial I recalled and mentioned earlier in this thread. Dave, did you add preload adjusters on the bike and why or why not? Next is an engineering question. Would the fork oil retain viscosity longer with the added ports and enlarging the original ports? Pure curiosity but my thought is the increase in flow decreases resistance and pressure lowering overall temperature and extending the life/performance of the hydraulic fluid. Sorry to give you a glimpse of the rabbit holes my thoughts cascade through every day.
I did later install fork caps from the Honda CB1100 that incorporated preload adjusters. It stands to reason that fork fluid would retain viscosity longer if it operated at lower stress and temperatures over time but I have never investigated that one way or the other. I change the fluid fairly often and I doubt it degrades much in 15,000 miles even in stock forks.
 

Sparkynutz

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Thought it might be good to share this here. Great, detailed vid on installing fork cartridge emulators.

No way I'm cutting crap and drilling holes. Any aftermarket setups that don't require that and be returned to stock if need be?
I'm 6' 170lb but hitting big bumps on hwy etc is pretty harsh. faster suspension would be nice.
 

Makingitwork6999

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Wow. So much here to read. I have not taken it all in yet. So maybe i am adding chewing gum to a wall covered in gum.

The truth of the matter is, newer is not always better. And, yes you can argue for all the new tech and development.

Now, forgive me, but my nc700 2013 front brake caliper seems to be a lot better than the current ones. It is designed differently. I have two brake lines. Not one. I have multiple pistons. Now. Back to the issue of the thread.

People always think that the next newest bike or car will give them a better feeling about what they ride. This is so far from the truth.

A quick diversion: I bought three Pontiac Sunfires. One every two years. My first one was very nice for the price point. But as the years rolled on, the defects creeped in. After the third one, I realized that some of the parts were taken right from the Chevy cavalier. Right down to the rattling shift knob. Something that drove me bananas. The doors would never close properly, and I kept getting a static shock as I exited the vehicle. A nasty one. Pontiac then shut down forever.

Having a larger front wheel on a frame designed for a bike that was designed for a 17” front wheel is a compromise. Surely people wanted better forks and decent fork travel. If the travel is shorter, you need a suspension tuned for you- and more urgently.

But nothing beats a suspension that is adjustable. People want a seat that has some give in it. And a forward slope sells a bike at the showroom, but it feels awful for any man swinging a pair of coconuts. Nobody wants a motorcycle seat wedgie after 2 hours. Things go numb.

A safer way to play this game is this. Look back through the model years. See what changed. Test ride different model years. Maybe test ride a bike with a corbin seat. Take notes. Pick and choose the strongest mods. Make a choice and buy a bike. Then stop at the parts counter. Then go online and order from Amazon.

Get ready to work at it. I have two seats. I swap them from time to time. One I got online. It was twisted and broken. Nothing that a little epoxy can’t fix. Experiment with what feels good for you

I swapped out my suspension in an afternoon. And swapped out the forks twice again after that… each time tweaking the oil level on two weekends. Why? The handling just pain sucked. Road dips were dangerous. And any road joint where the asphalt lifted was potentially deadly at 70mph. The suspension was not tuned for me. It just was not. The seat was not setup for me. It had conformed to someone else’s butt. The tires were highway cruiser tires. Not my style. And the brand clone muffler was wide open.

One should always take modding into consideration before buying new. An older bike with a few mods can bring greater happiness than a brand new stock bike. And it is often way cheaper.

On this forum, I created a mod list. I have most of those mods or.. hmmm…. Almost all of them. It is safe to say, I am very happy with the functions of the bike.

Honda is not known for better than so-so suspensions that conform to your needs. They make suspensions that work and last a long time.

If you want to be happier, find out what aspects of the bike make you displeased. Get a team together and talk about it. Grab a wrench or a good mechanic and go at it. Do not expect your first change to work perfectly. I get good at things through failure. I make vast improvements through failure. I fail at stuff a lot. Imagine how good at things I have gotten. People sometimes come up to me and say, "Holy sh*t!!". And I say, "That's my name, don't wear it out!".

Identify what feelings you do not like. Know why you don't like them. Are the forks sticky? Do they need lube? know what you can fix quickly. Do the forks rebound funky? Do the forks compress to slowly? Did someone overfill them? Do you have hydraulic lock? Are they just plain shot? Does your bike dive on braking? Does your bike sit on the rear tire when you throttle up? How can you tell, and know for sure? Do not just guess at it. Know it. Own it!

My seat and shock and forks work great together now. My handlebars cooperate with my riding posture. My windshield works. It all really works. These elements make your suspension feel better. It is not just the mechanical stuff in there. It is you- and how you interface with your bike. Where is your center of mass? How tall are you? Are you kinda large like me? What is your terrain of choice. How fast do you ride? Are you small and skinny? All these things have to work together to create a good experience. It can be done cheaply.

Do you keep a note book on your intended changes? To you take pictures of your TV when on YouTube? Do you store notes when you surf amazon? Do you snap photos in the showroom at the dealer so you can swap parts from bike to bike?

It is funny what you can do with an unlimited amount of time to do it, crazy amounts of terrain, and a great team to help.

A Chinese proverb: A crisis is an opportunity riding the dangerous wind. <- Note: Link hidden in here
 
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dduelin

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No way I'm cutting crap and drilling holes. Any aftermarket setups that don't require that and be returned to stock if need be?
I'm 6' 170lb but hitting big bumps on hwy etc is pretty harsh. faster suspension would be nice.
Cogent Dynamics DDC are drop-in installation.

motocd.com
 

Makingitwork6999

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Good one! Dduelin! I had to drill two holes in my fork slides. And I messed it up terribly. Dragged the drill bit all over the side on both of the fork tubes. I was so upset. The reality is, after watching a terrible episode of Lost in Space with 400 grit and a lot of forearm energy, problem solved. The slide ring won't know that you scratched them. The holes are not even perfectly in the same place on both slides. I told myself this cannot be right. But after all the testing, to quote a line from Meatballs, "It just doesn't matter!"
 
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