Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 42

Thread: would u pay $1000 to avoid a skinned knee??

  1. #31
    Senior Member Fuzzy's Avatar
    Bike: NC700XD, Versys X-300
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    South Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee
    Posts
    4,153
    Quote Originally Posted by melensdad View Post
    ...... Today I rode in tennis shoes, no gloves but protective pants, jacket & helmet. ....
    Gloves could be the second most important thing after a helmet. I'm told it is not possible to graft skin on the palm of the hand. Go down, put your hands out and get major road rash on your palms and you could lose use of hand for the rest of your life.
    Apply dog logic to life:
    "Eat Well, Be Loved, Get Petted, Sleep A Lot, and Dream Of A Leash Free World."

    ATG ATT

  2. #32
    Senior Member would u pay 00 to avoid a skinned knee??
    Bike: SV,NC,berg 570s
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    380
    I agree that gloves are #2 on the list of gear.

    I've ridden down the street wearing shorts, t shirt, sandals... helmet, gloves.
    12 NC700X
    11 FE570
    11 FS570
    15 450/520XCF SM

  3. #33
    Senior Member rippin209's Avatar
    Bike: 2012 NC700X
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    US
    Posts
    1,509
    Just my opinion but I think there's a balance to that, I went down in April, I was only going around 40mph when it happened so YMMV but unless your incredibly strong and determined to keep sliding on your hands your going to make initial contact (or whatever part of your body makes contact with the road first) depending on how you crash and how you respond but after that your either rolling, tumbling or sliding on a larger surface then your hands. Most of my gear was at least a little banged up so I was buying replacement gloves and jacket (currently using my old helmet, still fine I just got a deal on a better helmet and that's what got damaged unfortunately) the replacement jacket was simply different but the first pair of gloves was very armored (close to GP quality) and was uncomfortable I tried multiple other pairs (cycle gear has a great return policy) as I said earlier this is simply my opinion but I think the fit of the gloves so you can comfortably control the motorcycle is most important, then there is also the cost of course.

    Gloves too small cause cramping and discomfort and gloves to large create slop which causes flapping and vibration at speed as well as less control at lower speeds due to your hand moving in the glove

    That is the pair I went down wearing


    This is the pair I ended up with for replacement, little to no difference in protection unfortunately, but they fit like a second set of skin

    If curious my replacement jacket was a Tourmaster intake air 5.0 which is working perfectly for me
    Last edited by rippin209; 18th September 2019 at 15:52.

  4. #34
    Senior Member
    Bike: 2013 NC700X
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Northeast Alabama
    Posts
    750
    Yep, everyone looks at things differently, but I rank gloves lower than some other gear. I've wrecked at speed on dirt roads and asphalt, numerous times, on various bikes. motocross/street. Hands have never been the main damaged part. Gotten a couple cuts on my knuckles where thin gloves tore, wrecked a dirt bike trying to ride wheelies once on the street, no gloves, hands just scraped up around knuckles. You generally hit and tumble, not ski on your hands. Knees, pelvis, back, butt, shoulders, and elbows, and head are all susceptible to taking far more damage than your hands. In most cases. Not to say hands can't get trashed, bc they can. But most cases, they dont take the most damage.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

  5. #35
    Member
    Bike: 700x
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    san diego
    Posts
    85
    Ive come off just about everything with wheels multiple times. The worst was a cantaloupe sized rash that i tore open twice skateboarding in pools. Ill take that any day over a broken bone. I came of a bike wearing motorcycle boots, absolutely zero rash, but 12 broken bones in my foot. So until they make pants that prevent breaks, Im out at $1000
    Last edited by kalifornia; 18th September 2019 at 16:28.

  6. #36
    Senior Member Old Can Ride's Avatar
    Bike: NC700X
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Webster, Texas
    Posts
    6,852
    I paid big dollars for the cycleport riding gear. As much as I ride, this was a great investment. For textile polyester garments the higher the denier number the higher the price. I have been down at speeds well into the 60’s. I have dislocated bones, but not a shingle scratch. Also, my textile clothing is sent back to the manufacture for repair after each crash.

    Your blue jeans have a denier factor of around 50. Some textile motorcycle gear have a denier factor of about 400, but most gear now days has a 600 denier factor. That is a lot better tear factor than the blue jeans.

    Although I do wear textile riding clothing with a 1000 denier factor, I do know a few very interesting facts. When you put a grinder sander to those 50 denier blue jeans it grinds though in about a 1/2 a second. On 600 denier textile material it takes about a second to grind though the textile with the sander. On the 1000 denier textile material it takes about a second and 1/2 to grind though the textile with a sander.

    So, the denier factor of the textile clothing does help some. However, that padding that is in the motorcycle clothing takes on average a full 3 seconds to grind though.

    So, the padding in the motorcycle clothings is what will keep the skin on the bones. I know beyond any doubt that the padding in the clothing is a lot more important than the denier factor. Wearing the textile clothing with the proper padding is the factor that makes the most difference. So, wearing the light weight textile clothing in the summer with the proper padding is almost as safe as that heavy duty leather racer clothing.....
    Last edited by Old Can Ride; 18th September 2019 at 19:20.
    Why not seize the pleasure at once? -- How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, and foolish planning? Just do it. Shut the frunk up and Ride !!!!!!!!!!

  7. #37
    Senior Member melensdad's Avatar
    Bike: 2016 NC700x DCT + 2018 NC750x DCT
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Chicagoland (NW Indiana) USA
    Posts
    539
    Quote Originally Posted by Fuzzy View Post
    Gloves could be the second most important thing after a helmet. I'm told it is not possible to graft skin on the palm of the hand. Go down, put your hands out and get major road rash on your palms and you could lose use of hand for the rest of your life.
    I agree.

    Actually I hate riding without gloves but it was so darn hot that I went without. I have 2 pairs. Mesh Dianese summer and insulated Dianese gloves for cooler weather riding. But on the really hot days even the mesh gloves are too hot. I'm going to search for another pair, that has more mesh but is still protective. I think palm protection is far more important than knuckle protection for abrasion resistance.




    Quote Originally Posted by kalifornia View Post
    Ive come off just about everything with wheels multiple times. The worst was a cantaloupe sized rash that i tore open twice skateboarding in pools. Ill take that any day over a broken bone. I came of a bike wearing motorcycle boots, absolutely zero rash, but 12 broken bones in my foot. So until they make pants that prevent breaks, Im out at $1000
    As are most of us.

    But are you 'in' at $100, or maybe $200?

    Seems that most people who replied to your post have indicated that a good pair of protective motorcycle pants, with pads, can be had for $100 to $200.
    Last edited by melensdad; 18th September 2019 at 20:17.

  8. #38
    Senior Member rippin209's Avatar
    Bike: 2012 NC700X
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    US
    Posts
    1,509
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Can Ride View Post
    I paid big dollars for the cycleport riding gear. As much as I ride, this was a great investment. For textile polyester garments the higher the denier number the higher the price. I have been down at speeds well into the 60s. I have dislocated bones, but not a shingle scratch. Also, my textile clothing is sent back to the manufacture for repair after each crash.

    Your blue jeans have a denier factor of around 50. Some textile motorcycle gear have a denier factor of about 400, but most gear now days has a 600 denier factor. That is a lot better tear factor than the blue jeans.

    Although I do wear textile riding clothing with a 1000 denier factor, I do know a few very interesting facts. When you put a grinder sander to those 50 denier blue jeans it grinds though in about a 1/2 a second. On 600 denier textile material it takes about a second to grind though the textile with the sander. On the 1000 denier textile material it takes about a second and 1/2 to grind though the textile with a sander.

    So, the denier factor of the textile clothing does help some. However, that padding that is in the motorcycle clothing takes on average a full 3 seconds to grind though.

    So, the padding in the motorcycle clothings is what will keep the skin on the bones. I know beyond any doubt that the padding in the clothing is a lot more important than the denier factor. Wearing the textile clothing with the proper padding is the factor that makes the most difference. So, wearing the light weight textile clothing in the summer with the proper padding is almost as safe as that heavy duty leather racer clothing.....
    Vey good point and that's only talking about the benefit while sliding, I know it's not going to work miracles but the correct padding also makes a significant difference in impacts by dispersing the energy from the impact.
    Look at slow motion collisions, even at relatively low speeds they look terrible in slow motion (really highlights the OHHH that's why I'm sore) look at slow motion 15mph-25mph dismounts or impacts and you'll instantly be a easy chaos announcer, pointing out what the did wrong and how they look as awkward as a drunk ostrich while going down.
    If you were a dare devil on a bicycle as a child you've likely wrecked and skinned yourself pretty good and learned at least the basics in practical application of tuck and roll when wrecking on 2 wheels (keep your arms tight to your torso and legs straight, it helps protect your core and keeps you from back handing the pavement) if you've got that knowledge, wearing a decent shirt, blue jeans, work boots, helmet and any type of gloves, if you went down 25mph or slower, you'd possibly get a touch of road rash from your initial impact but not much, go run into a tree, stop sign, car or truck at 25mph and you'll be hurting, very possibly broken something, now just think about your average rate of speed?

    When I wrecked I was only going 40mph or so and my riding gear made a big difference, for me it was the impact, my riding jacket made a real difference, but if I was wearing a helite vest I've been thinking of purchasing for at least 2 years I might not have broken anything

    In the same thought of what if's and such I could have gone down wearing a helite and rolled now that I'm a round balloon and back handed the pavement like I was talking about earlier, then I'd have a busted hand and around $2,000 plus worth of riding gear is damaged (plus my motorcycle) assuming I didn't actually impact anything and just slid/rolled

    The lesson being buy the best gear you can afford, the balance of comfort/fit with as much protection as possible and you have to be able to afford it, I'd rather be standing on the side of the road pissed off my stuff is damaged then be hurt, possibly permanently.
    Nothing is guaranteed, plenty of people have died while driving tanks, I've simply gone from theoretical knowledge to practical application of the value of riding gear and think if your able to improve your odds without making yourself uncomfortable it's a good investment

  9. #39
    Senior Member would u pay 00 to avoid a skinned knee??
    Bike: SV,NC,berg 570s
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    380
    Quote Originally Posted by kalifornia View Post
    Ive come off just about everything with wheels multiple times. The worst was a cantaloupe sized rash that i tore open twice skateboarding in pools. Ill take that any day over a broken bone. I came of a bike wearing motorcycle boots, absolutely zero rash, but 12 broken bones in my foot. So until they make pants that prevent breaks, Im out at $1000
    you don't need to spend $1000. you can get a decent option for $200.
    12 NC700X
    11 FE570
    11 FS570
    15 450/520XCF SM

  10. #40
    Member halfmt1's Avatar
    Bike: Harley Sportster 1200S, Harley XR1200x, Suzuki DRZ 400sm
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    74
    In 1982, On a Friday, coming home from my summer job, I went bouncing down the road at 40 mph. I was 16 years old. I was in jeans, t-shirt, no helmet, had lots of road rash, slight concussion. Went back to my summer job on Monday.
    Today I am 53, if that happened now I would be in pieces. It seems the older I get, the more gear I wear in realization of my frailty.

Similar Threads

  1. Knee's and Frunk
    By aceiv in forum NC700 General Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 14th September 2018, 19:03
  2. Utopia backrest knee syndrome
    By KenW in forum NC700 General Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 1st May 2017, 14:21
  3. 10 Ways to Avoid Becoming Kill Boy Crash Picture
    By Fuzzy in forum NC700 General Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 7th September 2014, 11:03
  4. Lay Down Bike to Avoid Accident?
    By Fuzzy in forum NC700 General Discussion
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 31st August 2014, 15:37
  5. Knee cap cam into New York City
    By bulpup in forum NC700 Videos
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 13th April 2013, 11:52

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •