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Thread: I think I'm done Farkeling the NC750x for travel???

  1. #21
    Senior Member I think I'm done Farkeling the NC750x for travel??? dduelin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by melensdad View Post
    Just ordered an Atlas throttle lock

    I'm fed up with the GoCruise 2, part of the reason may be the fact that my brake level is not a factory brake lever, so I don't have the same notch in mine that the GoCruise type units fit into. Part of the reason is that it strains my hand to engage and I fiddle with getting it set for a long time before I'm reasonably happy. Once set it actually works, but it takes way too long for me to get it set to my satisfaction. Atlas sets easy and adjusts easy.

    Anyone want a GoCruise 2 unit? I actually have 2 of them. One is still in the package.
    I've had among the best throttle locks, BMW and Throttlemeister, and they create vacuum compared to the simple $20 Go Cruise because the latter works by setting a minimum speed without any fiddling. It's half a cruise control and is literally a 1 finger set. Any throttle lock that uses a drag mechanism to set one speed is inferior to one that sets a minimum speed. I didn't like the Go Cruise 2 because the adjustment thumb wheel makes it about 3 times thicker than the original, which works without the thumb wheel. I can see that some bikes may have grips too small or too large in diameter for the original GC to work but the Honda NCX isn't one of them.
    Dave

    GL1800
    NC700XD




  2. #22
    Senior Member I think I'm done Farkeling the NC750x for travel??? davidc83's Avatar
    Bike: Suzuki C50; 2009 klx250sf; 2013 Nc700
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    Quote Originally Posted by dduelin View Post
    I've had among the best throttle locks, BMW and Throttlemeister, and they create vacuum compared to the simple $20 Go Cruise because the latter works by setting a minimum speed without any fiddling. It's half a cruise control and is literally a 1 finger set. Any throttle lock that uses a drag mechanism to set one speed is inferior to one that sets a minimum speed. I didn't like the Go Cruise 2 because the adjustment thumb wheel makes it about 3 times thicker than the original, which works without the thumb wheel. I can see that some bikes may have grips too small or too large in diameter for the original GC to work but the Honda NCX isn't one of them.
    Yep, I got a gocruise 1 and it is so easy to use; no adjustment wheel...I can see where that adjustment wheel could be a PITA...
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  3. #23
    Senior Member melensdad's Avatar
    Bike: 2016 NC700x DCT + 2018 NC750x DCT
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    The wheel on the GoCruise2 is there to get the proper tension on the grip. Once you get that properly adjusted you don’t have to mess with it again. It’s a set and forget thing. I dislike the way the unit engages to hold the speed, set it too slow and you have to start over, set it too fast and try to rotate the throttle down just enough and I end up slowing too much and starting over. Atlas is also a friction unit but allows for micro-adjustments (either direction) of the throttle. Friction locks will never be perfect but they can be useful.

  4. #24
    Senior Member melensdad's Avatar
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    The Atlas Throttle Lock was fitted and tested on the lovely wife's NC700x. Works great. It is astonishingly better than the GoCruise type of throttle lock. I'd been exposed to them in the past, but the Altas is even better than I remember. Installed another on my bike, but not yet tested. Yes, Atlas is expensive compared to the GoCruise style units. It's worth it.

    Top button engages.
    Bottom button disengages.
    Rotation of the throttle is always available to override, or micro adjust the speed.


  5. #25
    Senior Member I think I'm done Farkeling the NC750x for travel???
    Bike: 2013 NC700S
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    Thanks for the report. I had seen them at the last motorcycle show but never heard of someone using one on an NC.

  6. #26
    Senior Member I think I'm done Farkeling the NC750x for travel??? dduelin's Avatar
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    I was going to record a video today of how easy it is to set the $20 Go Cruise and how well it works but it would be lost on those that don't understand the benefits of how it works compared to a simple friction lock, even the $140 ones.
    Dave

    GL1800
    NC700XD




  7. #27
    Senior Member melensdad's Avatar
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    Without a doubt the Atlas throttle lock is 1000% better than a GoCruise.

    In fact other than the Madstadt windscreen, its probably my favorite addition. I'm loving the Corbin seat too, but both the Corbin seat an the Madstadt are passive additions while the Atlas is an active addition that you choose to use, or not.

    GoCruise lets you set the throttle. If you brake or roll the throttle forward the GoCruise will deactivate. If you accelerate the GoCruise will return to the prior point. Basically a good system for FLAT ground. Nothing else.

    The Atlas does not deactivate when you brake, but the brake overrides it. Let off the brake it the throttle lock stays at its locked point. Roll down the throttle and the Atlas holds you at the new throttle slower setting. Roll back to accelerate and the Atlas holds you at the new faster setting. It allows you to micro-adjust the throttle without having to do anything other than simply rolling the throttle one direction or the other. Great for hills and curves because your throttle hand over-rides it while it is still set. It's basically just a friction pad, pretty much the same thing as the "o-ring" trick, but with the Atlas you can deactivate it while the o-ring does not ever deactivate; as long as the O-ring is in place it is active.

  8. #28
    Senior Member melensdad's Avatar
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    So we just had a "farkle failure" today on my wife's '16 NC700x

    Her bike is lowered. Used a Soupy's adjustable lowering link and then teamed that up with the Soupy's adjustable kickstand. The kickstand has an aluminum foot extension that is screwed into the billet kickstand. That snapped off. Right at the top of the threads. So its firmly embedded into the threaded hole. Kickstand is useable but its just inconvenient.

    I could use an EZOut to remove the broken bit if I was at home, then thread the part of the extension (which I saved) and screw it back in. But I'm not at home. And I'm not planning to do that. I still have the original kickstand. My plan, after we get home, is to measure the length of the Soupy's kickstand as it is currently the correct length. Then cut out a section of the original kickstand and weld it back together. The original is a better design. The Soupy's design makes sense because it is designed to be adjustable, but I believe cutting down the original is the best solution.

  9. #29
    Senior Member melensdad's Avatar
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    And a ‘farkle failure’ photo.

    If you look close you can see the damage the Soupy’s stand is doing to the asphalt. There is now a pop can under the kickstand.


  10. #30
    Senior Member I think I'm done Farkeling the NC750x for travel??? dduelin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by melensdad View Post
    Without a doubt the Atlas throttle lock is 1000% better than a GoCruise.

    In fact other than the Madstadt windscreen, its probably my favorite addition. I'm loving the Corbin seat too, but both the Corbin seat an the Madstadt are passive additions while the Atlas is an active addition that you choose to use, or not.

    GoCruise lets you set the throttle. If you brake or roll the throttle forward the GoCruise will deactivate. If you accelerate the GoCruise will return to the prior point. Basically a good system for FLAT ground. Nothing else.

    The Atlas does not deactivate when you brake, but the brake overrides it. Let off the brake it the throttle lock stays at its locked point. Roll down the throttle and the Atlas holds you at the new throttle slower setting. Roll back to accelerate and the Atlas holds you at the new faster setting. It allows you to micro-adjust the throttle without having to do anything other than simply rolling the throttle one direction or the other. Great for hills and curves because your throttle hand over-rides it while it is still set. It's basically just a friction pad, pretty much the same thing as the "o-ring" trick, but with the Atlas you can deactivate it while the o-ring does not ever deactivate; as long as the O-ring is in place it is active.
    Let me try and explain why my experience is so different from yours. First, for those that don't know what is is or how it works, the Go Cruise clamps around the throttle grip and when you set it to use the GC rests against the top of the brake lever and prevents the throttle from rolling off. It is just an adjustable throttle stop, it sets a minimum speed the bike will not go below. Braking does not deactivate it or change the set speed......if you need to slow a little bit to keep distance from a merging or exiting vehicle ahead of you then you just apply brake as needed - the brakes override the GC but do not release it. When it is clear again you release the brakes and the bike accelerates back up to the speed previously set. You set it at the speed you want by pressing down on the GC with your forefinger and push it against the top of the brake lever. Because the stock throttle grip and the rubber band over the grip will "give" a little and allow the speed to drop 2-3 mph, you quickly learn to hold it down against the brake lever with the forefinger and use your other 3 fingers to add the smidge of extra throttle rotation necessary to off set the "give" of the grip. What I'm trying to explain is one finger holds it down while you make micro adjustments up or down to the throttle. With a little practice it's really set it and forget as you know how much extra throttle to add. If you need to speed up a little, you hold it down against the brake lever with the forefinger and add a throttle as necessary. Rolling off a little moves the GC to the new setting at a slower speed. Shutting or rolling the throttle closed moves the GC completely back up to the "Off" position.

    So when we are talking about flat terrain riding there isn't much difference at all between the GC and a simple friction lock that holds the throttle at one setting, at one set speed. Once you fiddle with the micro adjustments to hold the speed you what it you are done. Where the GC differs from a friction lock is when riding in rolling or hilly country. As the bike starts up the hill you roll on throttle as necessary to hold the desired speed and when approaching the crest of the hill you release the extra throttle and let the GC stop the throttle against the lever. Down the backside of the hill the bike picks up speed of course but if the hill isn't much the bike speeds up a little then as the terrain flattens the bike settles back to the set speed with no adjustments necessary. If the hill is steep enough to make the bike speed up too much going down the backside then you let off the extra throttle before the crest and let the bike speed 'catch' up with the hill crest so when going down the back side the increase in speed remains acceptable. It's intuitive and easily learned. With a friction lock you have to fiddle with it up and down hill, both sides, all the time. The GC requires half as many adjustments. And riding a DCT bike enhances this difference. Because you can easily thumb a downshift without changing the mph you are running then when you start up the hill you just leave the throttle set with the GC and when the bike starts to slow down climbing the hill, you thumb a downshift from 6th to 5th and the torque multiplication of the lower gear lets the bike hold the set speed up to the crest without fiddling and as you go down the back side just leave it in 5th and the engine braking in 5th keeps the bike from speeding up too much. This works really well on long rolling hills.

    I used simple friction lock devices from the $1.00 O-ring to the $150.00 Throttlemeister on several bikes for 220,000 miles including a couple of trips from coast to coast before I discovered the simple $20 Go Cruise 75,000 miles ago. For the reasons I tried to explain here I'd never go back to a friction lock. For me the GC is simply easier to use and works better. It's kind of like half of a real cruise control, the upper half. I tried the metal Go Cruise 2 once but did not like it as much as the original one. The pic shows the Go Cruise clipped in place on the inner end of the throttle grip, the end of it rests on top of the brake lever. The forefinger, trigger finger, presses it down to set it.

    Dave

    GL1800
    NC700XD




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