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Thread: RaceTech Gold Valve Emulators and Springs...

  1. #31
    Senior Member RaceTech Gold Valve Emulators and Springs...
    RaceTech Gold Valve Emulators and Springs...

    Bike: 2016 NC700X DCT ABS
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    It was such a nice day to ride so the devil took me and I decided to use the eBay fork caps.

    Measured fork travel off the bike is 143mm.
    This is me pushing and pulling on the tube with no oil or spring. Bottom out to top out.

    I guessed at the spacer length after putting everything together dry fit, I used 180mm with the adjustable cap all the way out. Here are the sag numbers at that setting, which I can make up to 15mm less by screwing in the adjusters on the caps:

    Bike Sag (no rider) = 38mm = %26
    Rider Sag (185 lbs) = 47mm = %32

    I took it for a ride over some potholes and small bumps (driveway / sidewalk transitions) and did some hard front braking, maximum recorded travel was about 115mm or %80.

    Normal riding it doesn't feel much different than stock, but there is a definite improvement in handling and less jarring over road imperfections.

    My original sag number was somewhere high sixties, now the front is 20mm higher and handles better. Will have to try highway speeds some other time.

    I think these things are worth it but need to be coupled with the correct spring and preload to get the full effect. I'm going to leave them as is for a few thousand miles.



    Here is a wood jig I made to drill the damper rods:


  2. #32
    Senior Member RaceTech Gold Valve Emulators and Springs...
    RaceTech Gold Valve Emulators and Springs...

    Bike: 2016 NC700X DCT ABS
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    I got to ride it more for a few hours today in more varied conditions, in the rain no less. My tires were about 2-3 psi over inflated. (It's still cold here.)

    First I did my commute to work, where I know every bump, man hole cover, pothole and crappy section of road.

    I will say that the new fork configuration is 'stiffer' than stock when it comes to very small bumps and low velocity fork movements. It is not plush over small (less than 1 inch) irregularities and bumps - eg that right tire track where the road starts to crack and crumble.
    I decided to go with 15wt oil and two holes in the valve, so that is to be expected. I do not mind it and like the way it handles in turns. Very similar to stock at 'low' speed (speed of fork movement, not the bike, all this was done at 25-30mph.)

    The first time I tried emergency braking on the bike with the stock forks last year, they collapsed almost all the way to that really stiff section at the top, then on the rebound almost launched me off the bike.
    None of that with the new setup, there was less dive and rebound was more controlled. Stopping quicker and shorter too. (To be fair, I did just service the brakes.)

    Potholes: I purposely aimed the bike towards some potholes (25-30 mph), deep enough so that the gravel under the asphalt was exposed. The bike seemed to almost float over these, a definite up and down sensation, but no jarring.

    Speed Bumps: On my way to work, when transitioning from regular road to highway, there is this section where it goes from asphalt to concrete and that seam is at least 3 inches high very sharp bump.
    It doesn't help that this is the part of the ramp where you're supposed to be accelerating from 25mph to 55mph. I hit it at about 40mph, on my toes expecting the usual jolt up through the bars to my shoulders and much to my surprise there was no 'ouch' moment. The bars went up and down but no jarring.

    Heaved Road: There's some sections of road here that are wavy and I did notice a lot of up and down movement, but that was more pronounced at the rear and probably the rear shock. (Still stock, talking to the folks at Nitron for options here...)

    The rest of the day was pretty mellow street cruising and speeds up to 65mph on normal good condition highway (wet too) and no weird handling or cornering issues.

  3. #33
    Senior Member rippin209's Avatar
    Bike: 2012 NC700X
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    Quote Originally Posted by supertux1 View Post
    I got to ride it more for a few hours today in more varied conditions, in the rain no less. My tires were about 2-3 psi over inflated. (It's still cold here.)

    First I did my commute to work, where I know every bump, man hole cover, pothole and crappy section of road.

    I will say that the new fork configuration is 'stiffer' than stock when it comes to very small bumps and low velocity fork movements. It is not plush over small (less than 1 inch) irregularities and bumps - eg that right tire track where the road starts to crack and crumble.
    I decided to go with 15wt oil and two holes in the valve, so that is to be expected. I do not mind it and like the way it handles in turns. Very similar to stock at 'low' speed (speed of fork movement, not the bike, all this was done at 25-30mph.)

    The first time I tried emergency braking on the bike with the stock forks last year, they collapsed almost all the way to that really stiff section at the top, then on the rebound almost launched me off the bike.
    None of that with the new setup, there was less dive and rebound was more controlled. Stopping quicker and shorter too. (To be fair, I did just service the brakes.)

    Potholes: I purposely aimed the bike towards some potholes (25-30 mph), deep enough so that the gravel under the asphalt was exposed. The bike seemed to almost float over these, a definite up and down sensation, but no jarring.

    Speed Bumps: On my way to work, when transitioning from regular road to highway, there is this section where it goes from asphalt to concrete and that seam is at least 3 inches high very sharp bump.
    It doesn't help that this is the part of the ramp where you're supposed to be accelerating from 25mph to 55mph. I hit it at about 40mph, on my toes expecting the usual jolt up through the bars to my shoulders and much to my surprise there was no 'ouch' moment. The bars went up and down but no jarring.

    Heaved Road: There's some sections of road here that are wavy and I did notice a lot of up and down movement, but that was more pronounced at the rear and probably the rear shock. (Still stock, talking to the folks at Nitron for options here...)

    The rest of the day was pretty mellow street cruising and speeds up to 65mph on normal good condition highway (wet too) and no weird handling or cornering issues.
    A very thorough and well written account of what your suspension mods have done for you. Sense it also makes a difference, what do you weigh?

  4. #34
    Senior Member RaceTech Gold Valve Emulators and Springs...
    RaceTech Gold Valve Emulators and Springs...

    Bike: 2016 NC700X DCT ABS
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    Quote Originally Posted by rippin209 View Post
    A very thorough and well written account of what your suspension mods have done for you. Sense it also makes a difference, what do you weigh?
    I weigh 200 pounds all geared up, about 190 without the boots / helmet / leathers.

  5. #35
    Junior Member wingysataday's Avatar
    Bike: 12'nc700x off road manual
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    I'm a dual sport guy and with the current set-up the springs are so stiff It threw me off the bike over a woop section. According to racetech the stock spring is rated at (.63) The lowest spring racetech sales for our bike is (.80). Now after reading this post I thing the "progressive" part is what is killing me. I want as soft as possible. I weigh 175 and rarely carry any gear. Since I am using the fork extenders I cannot use the aftermarket adjustable valves.
    If I order the (.80) springs do you think this would cure my "pogo stick" problem? Can/Should I drill out any of the stock suspension?

  6. #36
    Senior Member
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    If you're gonna ride whoops, maybe consider a DR-Z. :-)

  7. #37
    Senior Member RaceTech Gold Valve Emulators and Springs...
    RaceTech Gold Valve Emulators and Springs...

    Bike: 2016 NC700X DCT ABS
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    RaceTech Gold Valve Emulators and Springs...

    Quote Originally Posted by wingysataday View Post
    I'm a dual sport guy and with the current set-up the springs are so stiff It threw me off the bike over a woop section. According to racetech the stock spring is rated at (.63) The lowest spring racetech sales for our bike is (.80). Now after reading this post I thing the "progressive" part is what is killing me. I want as soft as possible. I weigh 175 and rarely carry any gear. Since I am using the fork extenders I cannot use the aftermarket adjustable valves.
    If I order the (.80) springs do you think this would cure my "pogo stick" problem? Can/Should I drill out any of the stock suspension?
    The stock spring is probably .63 in that soft section at the bottom which collapses to almost solid coil on coil mass when you sit on the bike.

    What's left is that widely spaced super stiff part at the top and with the dampener single rate of flow you get a very harsh ride over large bumps if you are a heavy person.

    The first step in fixing all that is to get a spring that allows the appropriate amount of sag for your riding style and weight. Nothing else matters if the sag is all wrong. After that, you can play with dampening by changing oil weight, adjusting the valve, etc...

    I believe the RaceTech numbers are for street performance not dirt, as is the NC700 itself. Their main business revolves around faster lap times. So you might want to go with a lighter spring, less valve preload, silver valve spring, lighter oil etc... Beware that will make it softer at the same time more pogo stick like and the front end will collapse more and be less planted in turns. You can't have it both ways.

    You should be able to use the valves with fork extenders, you'll just have to figure out the spacer length on your own. I did mine so that they come to the top of the chrome tube like the stock one does. All the preload comes from the fork cap itself.
    Last edited by supertux1; 8th April 2017 at 23:33.

  8. #38
    Junior Member wingysataday's Avatar
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    Thanks I might have a local suspension guy do some work on them.

  9. #39
    Senior Member RaceTech Gold Valve Emulators and Springs...
    Bike: 2012 NC700x
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    Quote Originally Posted by wingysataday View Post
    I'm a dual sport guy and with the current set-up the springs are so stiff It threw me off the bike over a woop section. According to racetech the stock spring is rated at (.63) The lowest spring racetech sales for our bike is (.80). Now after reading this post I thing the "progressive" part is what is killing me. I want as soft as possible. I weigh 175 and rarely carry any gear. Since I am using the fork extenders I cannot use the aftermarket adjustable valves.
    If I order the (.80) springs do you think this would cure my "pogo stick" problem? Can/Should I drill out any of the stock suspension?
    1) You should drill out the damping rods per the RaceTech emulator directions. Without doing that, you're really not getting the most out of the RaceTech emulator or it's valve stack compression damping.

    2) Run linear springs (from RaceTech or anyone else) in the weight they recommend. I am 190lbs and it recommended I think a .93 spring. My front end is "not stiff."

    3) This is very important and can be easily messed up: When you install the RaceTech emulator, place it on the bottom of the spring first, then slide the entire spring and valve into the fork (with it laying horizontally) until it reaches the bottom. If you just "drop it in," the emulator can tilt to one side or the other and when you put the spring in, it won't seat properly. What that means in the real world is you will find your fork is extremely stiff (because you have essentially added 2" of spring length). I know it sounds unlikely since the emulator is so perfectly the size of the fork tube, but trust me - from experience - it can and does happen, and when it does, you have a fork that is so damn stiff it's miserable to ride.

  10. #40
    Senior Member RaceTech Gold Valve Emulators and Springs...
    RaceTech Gold Valve Emulators and Springs...

    Bike: 2016 NC700X DCT ABS
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    Quote Originally Posted by Antarius View Post
    1) You should drill out the damping rods per the RaceTech emulator directions. Without doing that, you're really not getting the most out of the RaceTech emulator or it's valve stack compression damping.

    2) Run linear springs (from RaceTech or anyone else) in the weight they recommend. I am 190lbs and it recommended I think a .93 spring. My front end is "not stiff."

    3) This is very important and can be easily messed up: When you install the RaceTech emulator, place it on the bottom of the spring first, then slide the entire spring and valve into the fork (with it laying horizontally) until it reaches the bottom. If you just "drop it in," the emulator can tilt to one side or the other and when you put the spring in, it won't seat properly. What that means in the real world is you will find your fork is extremely stiff (because you have essentially added 2" of spring length). I know it sounds unlikely since the emulator is so perfectly the size of the fork tube, but trust me - from experience - it can and does happen, and when it does, you have a fork that is so damn stiff it's miserable to ride.
    2) Use the calculator here:

    RT - Digital Product Search

    3) A good point! I dry fit everything together and made a note of where the spacer ended in relation to the top of the tube.

    I used a long parts grabber claw to install the valve and pushed it so it would seat with no play.

    After I figured out that, I removed the valve, spring and spacers and filled the tube with a bit of oil, just enough to cover the damper rod and pumped it to get the air out.

    I reseated the valve with the parts grabber, collapsed the fork tube and filled to the recommended oil level.

    Put the spring and spacer back and verified they were at the same location when dry fit.

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