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Thread: Oh look, It's another NC700X Adventure Build

  1. #1
    Member JacobRobinson5's Avatar
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    Oh look, It's another NC700X Adventure Build

    Hello! As the title insist, this is another "Adventure Build" thread. First of all, Shoutout to vwhammer for his awesome build that y'all should check out if you haven't already. It should be labeled "NCX ADV Build Overview" but I'll double check after I post this thread.

    So I guess this is where I'll begin. I bought my NC700XD right at a year ago. After just a few short months of riding it, I was really seeing the possibilities of how the NCX could be a really strong ADV bike. Three main things about the bike made me think the NC was a good candidate to attempt to build: 1) The 670cc twin was just monstrous when it came to straight up torque; 2) The suspension was great on the road and was manageable offroad; 3) The low slung engine and underseat tank let the bike carry its weight pretty low while maintaining decent ground clearance. Along with a few other factors, those three made up my mind that I had plans for this bike.

    My first temporary upgrade to test out the NCX's abilities was a set of Continental TKC 80's. They were a dream offroad but, almost needless to say, I only got about 3500 miles out of them. Along with the first set of tires came a skid plate and barkbusters to help protect against trees and rocks and stuff. So up to this point we're talking really basic additions, which I wouldn't even consider a build, but it gets better. Before I go any farther, here's a quick before picture.

    Oh look, It's another NC700X Adventure Build-img_20170510_164343284-jpg

    That's what it was like. Nearly a year later after first purchasing my bike I finally got to do some more substantial offroad mods. It was late 2016 and I was doing some digging on how to make the NC more aggressive for offroad use. I found a few different options for ground clearance, as it was my main concern, and then some more expensive options for the suspension itself. Well considering my financing department would not allow me to go crazy with souped up and swapped out suspension components I started thinking low budget build. After so much time digging and looking to find the best bang for the buck, I finally came into some extra cash and bought some cheaper additions for the bike.

    The first thing I done was opted for fork extensions. I know people say they're dangerous or pointless or whatever, but on the NC they're fantastic. I bought them off VTXtreme and payed about $75 for 2 inch billet extensions. I would've went stainless steel but between hearing how the aluminum ones do just fine and the extra $40 for stainless steel I decided not to. Here's what it looked like after the extensions were installed.

    Oh look, It's another NC700X Adventure Build-img_20170613_131354741_hdr-jpg

    After installing the extensions I had my new tires installed I bought a week prior to receiving the fork extensions. Now one person reading this will ask "Why didn't you go ahead and install your tires then put your extensions on?" and I would say that's a good question and the reason why is because a 130/80r17 will hit my radiator under full compression and I didn't need that happening. Yes the stock front tire size is a 120/70r17 but I went with the larger tire in order to mimic the tire diameter of a bike with a 19 inch wheel and went wider because why not? Now in order to get a tubeless front tire that is sized in a 130/80 I had to go with a set of Shinko 705's. I stuck with the 150/70 rear but upsized the front to bring me closer to my front tire being taller than the rear tire as I'm used to riding mx bikes, XR650's, and a V-Strom or two. With only the fork extensions and tires on the bike the front end became slower as in its willingness to lean over and straighten up but it's not bad at all. Here's the bike with the fork extensions and the new tires.

    Oh look, It's another NC700X Adventure Build-img_20170616_165345781_hdr-jpg

    It definitely changes the look and ergonomics of the bike but I still wasn't finished with her just yet. When I ordered my fork extensions from Gadsden, Alabama, I also ordered a set of shorter rear linkages to raise the bike up 40mm (roughly an inch and a half I believe). Here's the difference:

    Oh look, It's another NC700X Adventure Build-img_20170620_111724978-jpgOh look, It's another NC700X Adventure Build-img_20170620_111750781-jpgOh look, It's another NC700X Adventure Build-img_20170620_111807353_hdr-jpg

    The linkages speak for themselves. They were like 30 bucks and only took a week and a half to come in from Britain so I was very pleased with the rear links. Now before I show y'all what the finished product looks like, I just want to say that I believe I have found the way Honda should build the NC700X especially for those of us over 6 feet tall and over 200 pounds. The rear linkages stiffened up the suspension to where even though the seat height is that of the Africa Twin (my dad and I compared our bikes which I sadly didn't take a picture but will upload one later) I feel the most comfortable I've ever been on my motorcycle. I even scrubbed my peg accidentally going down a little road with funny cambered turns and realised I was doing 60+ on a raised up "adventure" bike on a 30 mph road. Luckily the road was forgiving that day and spared me from falling victim to my stupidity, aka don't ride that fast, just for future reference lol. Anyways, the bike is now raised roughly 2 inches from stock in the rear and about 3.5 inches in the front I believe, thus making the seat and ground clearance in the middle of the bike about 2.5 inches higher than stock. It may not seem like much but it makes a huge difference offroad especially when crossing creeks, fallen trees, big rocks, and for those time you don't see the hole in the road. I even jumped the railroad tracks and didn't scrape the skid plate! lol but here y'all go, the NC with everything I've put on so far.

    Oh look, It's another NC700X Adventure Build-img_20170620_113646539_hdr-jpg

    I do have more pictures of the bike that I may post on here later and if you want to see more and I haven't posted any or haven't posted enough then I will gladly post more by request as well. I plan on adding to this thread as I build the bike a little more. I plan on coming up with a new front fender for the NC as well and so is vwhammer so definitely look to him if you're curious about changing up the stock fender. Other changes visually that will be made to the bike will most likely be exhaust, windscreen, seat, and just small cosmetic works; maybe a wrap or repaint eventually. With the suspension I haven't changed the shocks or springs any at all yet, may touch them in the future. Next step as of right now is a longer kickstand as the bike has some serious lean going on now. Well I hope y'all enjoyed the first part of my build thread and I hope to be back soon with some more content for y'all guys and gals. If anyone has questions, concerns, comments, etc. just leave them in the thread and I will try to get back to you as soon as possible. I'll go ahead and put a back to back comparison of the bike from beginning to end.

    Until next time, y'all ride on and stay safe.


    Oh look, It's another NC700X Adventure Build-img_20170510_164343284-jpgOh look, It's another NC700X Adventure Build-img_20170613_131358584_hdr-jpgOh look, It's another NC700X Adventure Build-img_20170616_165345781_hdr-jpgOh look, It's another NC700X Adventure Build-img_20170620_113646539_hdr-jpg

  2. #2
    Senior Member Oh look, It's another NC700X Adventure Build Nofear2trek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JacobRobinson5 View Post
    As the title insist, this is another "Adventure Build" thread.

    The first thing I done was opted for fork extensions. I know people say they're dangerous or pointless or whatever, but on the NC they're fantastic.

    After installing the extensions I had my new tires installed I bought a week prior to receiving the fork extensions. Now one person reading this will ask "Why didn't you go ahead and install your tires then put your extensions on?" and I would say that's a good question and the reason why is because a 130/80r17 will hit my radiator under full compression and I didn't need that happening. Yes the stock front tire size is a 120/70r17 but I went with the larger tire in order to mimic the tire diameter of a bike with a 19 inch wheel and went wider because why not? Now in order to get a tubeless front tire that is sized in a 130/80 I had to go with a set of Shinko 705's.

    I stuck with the 150/70 rear but upsized the front to bring me closer to my front tire being taller than the rear tire as I'm used to riding mx bikes, XR650's, and a V-Strom or two. With only the fork extensions and tires on the bike the front end became slower as in its willingness to lean over and straighten up but it's not bad at all.

    With the suspension I haven't changed the shocks or springs any at all yet, may touch them in the future.
    I have been following those attempting to beef up off road capabilities of the NC'.

    My main concern centers around the front suspension being pressed beyond its designed strength by adding extensions making the tubes longer (creating a change of rake and increased leverage), a much larger front tire, and the effect that its larger diameter and weight's effect on the forks.

    I'm not an engineer, so am only scratching my head about the effects and increased stress put on the forks that may not be beefy enough. More weight, higher braking drag, different rake, and longer leaverage, making the forks more susceptible to bending when being ridden off road more vigorously, just makes me wonder if larger diameter forks will also end up on the list of 'must change' items.

    Anyway, I'm rooting for you guys trying. Just my 2-cents.

    Ray

    Last edited by Nofear2trek; 24th June 2017 at 19:58.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member greenboy's Avatar
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    Good point to be aware of, Ray. My WR250R has 46mm forks and it weighs under 300 pounds wet and stock before a few non-essentials get stripped off. Of course it's got to support a lot more travel too: 10.6 inches if I recall.

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  4. #4
    Senior Member greenboy's Avatar
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    Speaking of fork problems on ADVs, some of the BMW 650 models had a spindly little fork, with an axle holder that for some unlucky owners would break off, I recall finding some horror stories when researching for a possible local buy that turned me away from what would otherwise have been a pretty good buy. I'm sure BMW's platoon of lawyers fended off a lot of responsibility there unless the people injured finally organized and mounted a class action...

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  5. #5
    Member JacobRobinson5's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nofear2trek View Post

    I have been following those attempting to beef up off road capabilities of the NC'.

    My main concern centers around the front suspension being pressed beyond its designed strength by adding extensions making the tubes longer (creating increased leverage), a much larger front tire, and the effect that its larger diameter and weight's effect on the forks. I'm not an engineer, so am only scratching my head about the effects and increased stress put on the forks that may not be beefy enough. More weight, higher braking drag, and longer leaverage susceptible to the forks bending, when being ridden off road more vigorously, just makes me wonder if larger diameter forks will also end up on the list of 'must change' items. Anyway, I'm rooting for you guys trying. Just my 2-cents.

    Ray

    Yes sir that is definitely a concern. So far I've heard of a few people off-roading with this setup on the front and no known issues but if I do have any issues I will let the community know via this thread and probably start a new thread too. I don't think it will be enough to warp or bend anything but I may have a little premature wear on some parts like brakes and fork internals but hopefully they'll hold up for a while lol

    Sent from my XT1080 using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Senior Member mtiberio's Avatar
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    fork slugs, hadn't seen or heard about the since the 70's...

  7. #7
    Member JacobRobinson5's Avatar
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    Alright y'all, I'm back with another addition to the bike. It's a little bit of a homebrew though if you get what I mean.

    So of course after raising the bike I ran into the issue of not having a long enough kickstand. On flat surfaces the bike has some serious lean, but on anything uneven or loose, the bike could easily tip over. Considering we like to offroad and take breaks on the trail, I didn't need my bike leaning over like it does. One of my captains at the fire department I work at owns a machining shop and I talked with him briefly about fabbing up a new kickstand. He said he was sure we could come up with something. Well until I get the time and money to get one fabbed up, I still have a bike that leans over pretty far. I got looking in my shop

  8. #8
    Senior Member mercurydog47's Avatar
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    try just adding an aluminum billet to the outer end of the kickstand...

  9. #9
    Senior Member greenboy's Avatar
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    Yeah, you can probably even stack the ultra cheap eBay anodized kickstand foot a couple deep to gain height if you get longer allen heads.

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  10. #10
    Member JacobRobinson5's Avatar
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    oops, computer went dead and accidentally posted an incomplete post earlier today

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