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Thread: Fuel efficient coasting?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Jt105's Avatar
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    Fuel efficient coasting?

    What is the best way to coast with the NC700?

    By habit, when coasting down a hill or to a stop sign/light, I will pull in the clutch. The motor will go to idle. When traffic begins to move or the light turns green, I'll downshift, give some throttle and let out the clutch. This was the way to do it when bikes used carburetors to save fuel.

    I have heard that the newer fuel injected motorcycles are smarter and will cut the fuel when coasting while in gear.
    Will the NC coast or engine brake down a hill and cut the fuel? Or will it burn more fuel because the engine is spinning faster in gear?

    I have a number of stoplights and stop signs on my commute. I try to coast and time the lights so that I don't have to stop. Not quite hypermiling, but i try to avoid racing to the light only to stop and wait there for it to turn green.

    JT

  2. #2
    Senior Member anglachel's Avatar
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    With fuel injection engine should be using no fuel when engine braking... (with RPM well above idle).
    It will use fuel when idling (even if you are idling while in gear with the clutch engaged).

    That said, if you are engine braking you slow down faster than if you are coasting, slowing down costs momentum which you need to use fuel to get back...

    I'm sure there is some perfect algorithm for when to coast and when to downshift for the best fuel economy... I don't know (or care) what it is

  3. #3
    Senior Member Fuel efficient coasting? dduelin's Avatar
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    The NC cuts the fuel off when the throttle is closed. Of course there is engine braking at work then so we can’t just close the throttle and coast w/o engine braking like a manual transmission can.

    I have observed that when running down a long grade under closed or partial throttle the digital mpg display goes in the high 90’s or pegs at 99.9 so I’m not sure there will be much fuel savings between clutch-in idle engine coasting vs just enough partial throttle to not have engine braking. You can only go downhill so long.
    Dave

    GL1800
    NC700XD




  4. #4
    Senior Member Jt105's Avatar
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    I've noticed that letting off the throttle in 6th gear there is very little engine braking. It is almost as good as pulling in the clutch. On my next tank, I'll make an effort to try coasting in 6th gear more to see if I notice a difference.

    JT

  5. #5
    Senior Member Fuel efficient coasting? dduelin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jt105 View Post
    I've noticed that letting off the throttle in 6th gear there is very little engine braking. It is almost as good as pulling in the clutch. On my next tank, I'll make an effort to try coasting in 6th gear more to see if I notice a difference.

    JT
    There are so many variables to MPG a tank or three is of not much use when the savings we are discussing are so minute. Just my opinion.

    If you set up a Fuelly account and tracked it for a year then I'd pay attention.
    Dave

    GL1800
    NC700XD




  6. #6
    Senior Member Fuel efficient coasting? New Commuter700's Avatar
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    I don't do much engine braking as I unlearned the habit a few years ago with cars. It was pointed out to me that changing brakes is easier than clutches and allowing the engine to idle is better than spinning it up, especially it you drop it into a too low gear as I did often. Remember that the less times the engine turns, the less wear and tear there is on it. That's one reason I went with the NC in the first place because it doesn't run at 10,000 rpms on the freeway. Also consider that over 100k miles on your bike if you get about 70 mpg you are only using about 1428 gallons of fuel. At $3 per gallon that's only $4284, less than the cost of a new bike. Getting 75 mpg instead is about $4000, a savings of $284 over the life of the bike. So saving a few mpg's may not be worth a decrease in durability.


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  7. #7
    Senior Member Rapturee's Avatar
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    Look up Fuel Economy, Hypermiling, EcoModding News and Forum - EcoModder.com, they have over 100 tips to great/increasing fuel economy in anything you drive. I practice many of their tips i everything i drive and often times make a game out of it on long trips! :{)
    Fiat Justicia et Peret Mundus = Do the Right thing, Come what May!

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    I believe clutches only wear when they are slipping. Most bikes can go to 100,000 miles on a clutch and longer.
    I leave it in top gear and just ease off on the throttle.
    On the DCT when I am coming up to a stop I put it in sport and it down shifts pretty much where I would do it. Then take off in sport and when I get up to speed put it in Drive. 2012 model. Otherwise I ease off the throttle and let it slowly downshift and ease up to the light.

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    Senior Member Fuel efficient coasting? dduelin's Avatar
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    I believe clutches are built to last a long time when treated well, particularly Honda wet clutches. I replaced the clutch plates in my 1972 Kawaski but that's the only one of twenty something bikes to follow and I like a perfectly timed throttle-blipped downshift for the right gear at the right time. Haven't worn out a Honda engine yet either...one has 194,000 miles on it now with the first 180,000 under me.
    Dave

    GL1800
    NC700XD




  10. #10
    Senior Member Fuel efficient coasting?
    Fuel efficient coasting?
    DirtFlier's Avatar
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    [...on the DCT when I am coming up to a stop I put it in sport and it down shifts pretty much where I would do it...1WiseGuy2]


    Not that I've tried but I assumed it is NOT possible to shift between D and S when the bike is still rolling?

    All this talk of squeezing another ounce of mileage from a bike that normally returns 65-70 mpg is pure madness. I could somewhat understand it if our fuel was $7+ per gallon as it is across the pond, but the latest fuel prices where I live is around $2.45 per gal.
    Last edited by DirtFlier; 20th August 2019 at 02:50.

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