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Thread: Considering Upgrading from Honda CBR300R

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Bike: Honda CBR300R
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    Considering Upgrading from Honda CBR300R

    Up to now I have been riding a Honda CBR300R. A good bike to learn on. In my non-bike life, I drive an automatic transmission car. The 750x DCT has caught my eye. I am 5'10" and the height and balance of the bike seems comfortable to sit on. I am not a fan of constantly changing gears and would rather use that energy to pay attention to the road and enjoy my surroundings.

    I am wondering what are some of the idiosyncrasies or general thoughts of the DCT that other riders have found? I do not know of any other DCT riders in person and non-DCT riders have been generally negative about the idea of the DCT: You will be bored. What will you do if the bike shifts while in a corner? You will have less control over the bike in general. You will have less control going down hills. You will wear down your brakes faster. Something else that can break on the bike.

    Can you please provide your thoughts?

    Thank you

  2. #2
    Member Considering Upgrading from Honda CBR300R Dellaster's Avatar
    Bike: 2012 KLX250S, 2013 F700GS
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    Welcome to the forum, Forty Two!

    Good questions. I’d like to hear the thoughts of NCX DCT owners, too. I have a co-volunteer who brought two KTMs with him, and more at home, who shows disdain for the Honda and DCT in particular. “It needs a dealer to do an expensive service on it at 40k miles”; “lf you don’t put it in neutral at every stop it’ll wear out the clutches quickly”; “Not just two oil filters, but a second oil sump for the DCT”; “Already old technology, racers have moved on to much better systems now”; and on and on. I get the impression that he, and many like him, don’t like the New Concept. Good thing I don’t care what others think.
    óTed | 2013 F700GS | 2012 KLX250S

  3. #3
    Senior Member drdubb's Avatar
    Bike: '14 Honda NC700XD, '71 Honda SL350
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    I have about 25000 miles on my 2014 DCT. At first, I wasn't sure about the bike, but now, I love it. I've done long trips, but most of my riding is to go out and do a 100 or 200 miles around home. If you want to shift, hit the paddles, if not, let it take care of itself. The bike has been flawless.

    Dance as if no one is watching.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Considering Upgrading from Honda CBR300R GgarryP's Avatar
    Bike: 2016 NC700X
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    1910-Cars will never be as reliable as a good old horse and buggy.
    1950- Automatic transmissions will never beat a good old manual.
    Ha! None of what they said is true. None!
    Go with the DCT. It's great. You'll love it.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
    Garry

    Two wheels and keels

  5. #5
    Senior Member Considering Upgrading from Honda CBR300R GgarryP's Avatar
    Bike: 2016 NC700X
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forty Two View Post
    I am wondering what are some of the idiosyncrasies or general thoughts of the DCT that other riders have found? I do not know of any other DCT riders in person and non-DCT riders have been generally negative about the idea of the DCT: You will be bored. What will you do if the bike shifts while in a corner? You will have less control over the bike in general. You will have less control going down hills. You will wear down your brakes faster. Something else that can break on the bike.
    If you need a manual transmission to keep from getting bored on a bike find something else to do. Shifts in a turn are not a problem with traction. You will have more control if you don't have to worry about being in the right gear during emergency maneuvers. You can always select Manual control if you want. The shift points are smart, downshifting when you need it for power or for engine braking. Engine braking actually reduces brake wear. DCT is another system that can break but it's pretty reliable. There are many high mileage bikes with no issues.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
    Garry

    Two wheels and keels

  6. #6
    Senior Member Considering Upgrading from Honda CBR300R
    Considering Upgrading from Honda CBR300R
    Red Rider's Avatar
    Bike: 2016 NC700 DCT, latest in a long line
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    With multiple Automatic modes and a Manual (trigger/paddle) mode to choose from you won’t get bored. The DCT can and will do anything you want or need it to do from rabbit starts at the stop light to leisurely effortless cruising to mountains and switchbacks to walking speed in the parking lots to blasting through the curves and turns. It’s always in the right gear. It won’t stall out on you because you miss-judged a turn and didn’t downshift in time. It won’t lose an ounce of speed on the upshifts in either auto or manual mode.... and on and on. In fact, i would go so far as to say that the DCT will challenge you to learn how to fully utilize and maximize the modes like no traditional clutched bike ever will. And once you do, you’ll have a load of fun with it.

    After decades of motorcycling I thought I’d miss the whole squeeze and kick routine. NOPE. I decided to give the latest (for bikes anyway) technology a shot and I have no regrets.

    As for maintenance, the DCT adds one additional small filter to be changed at every other oil change interval. And it’s as easy as one two three. No dealer required!
    And the part about neutral at stop lights is baloney. DCT is going into some of the most rugged adventure bikes and expensive touring bikes. I’ll certainly never “break it”..
    Last edited by Red Rider; 2nd September 2019 at 11:40.


    Iím supposed to respect my elders, but itís getting harder and harder for me to find one now ..

  7. #7
    Junior Member
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    Thank you for your input everyone. Please keep them coming.

    My biking will be probably 50% in town. Picking up milk from the grocery store, visiting friends, and running other errands where powering up my 6 cylinder minivan seem just silly from the gas-consumption point of view. There is a stop sign or a light every 5 feet and I am constantly shifting. On weekends and evenings it will be rides in the country but even there, I would like to enjoy the ride more by not shifting and as was mentioned, not having to worry about being in the correct gear for emergency manoeuvres.

    My favourite line from someone so far has been: If you do not want to shift gears than get a scooter!

  8. #8
    Super Moderator Considering Upgrading from Honda CBR300R 670cc's Avatar
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    I’m not a DCT owner and don’t want one, but you might be exactly the buyer that Honda intended for the DCT. If clutching and shifting isn’t something you love to do, and you won’t miss it, then the DCT is for you. Bored? No, there are plenty of modes and buttons to play with to keep you entertained. The transmission works very well. Shifts are smooth enough that shifts in a corner are hardly noticed.

    The lack of control you will have is that you can’t use a clutch to smooth out transitions between off and on throttle, or in slow curves. For very low speed turns, you can’t slip the clutch for fine speed control; you will need to rely on careful throttle control and dragging the rear brake. If you’re a relatively new rider and don’t already depend on those techniques, then you won’t miss the clutch so much.

    See if you can find a way to test ride a DCT motorcycle, then you’ll know if it’s right for you. I think you’ll find it to be an impressive machine, and fun to ride.

    As for the comment you heard about scooters, there’s nothing wrong with them either. My wife and I have 3 in the garage. In fact, there’s a 250cc CVT scooter parked right next to an 1800cc Goldwing. Which one to ride depends on what we’re doing. Why some people put scooters in a separate, often undesirable class, I don’t know.
    Last edited by 670cc; 2nd September 2019 at 12:07.
    Greg
    GWRRA Member
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    "Quarter Million Mile Club"

    NanCyX . . . . . . . . . . The 250

  9. #9
    Senior Member melensdad's Avatar
    Bike: 2016 NC700x DCT + 2018 NC750x DCT
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    Quote Originally Posted by 670cc View Post
    I’m not a DCT owner and don’t want one...

    The lack of control you will have is that you can’t use a clutch to smooth out transitions between off and on throttle, or in slow curves. For very low speed turns, you can’t slip the clutch for fine speed control; you will need to rely on careful throttle control and dragging the rear brake. If you’re a relatively new rider and don’t already depend on those techniques, then you won’t miss the clutch so much.
    ...
    The one thing that I had to figure out with the DCT is since there is no clutch, and therefore no ability to use the 'friction zone' it took me some time to figure out that my foot pressing the brake pedal going into turns and also for low speed maneuvers provides greater control.

    Basically I use rear brake against the throttle in much the same way that you use the clutch's friction zone against a throttle.

    I don't find that I have any "lack of control" at all. It just takes a slightly different technique.

    I'm loving the DCT. Honestly don't see any reason to buy a bike that doesn't have a DCT (or similar) system. It is amazing in traffic with stop & go traffic and works great everywhere else. I do override the DCT by using the button shifters for passing on highways, steep hills, etc but then the DCT takes over again automatically.
    Last edited by melensdad; 2nd September 2019 at 14:35.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Considering Upgrading from Honda CBR300R
    Considering Upgrading from Honda CBR300R
    Red Rider's Avatar
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    I’d echo 670cc on scooters. They are a blast to ride. I’ve owned several big and small. Anyone who just knocks them out of hand has probably never tried one and doesn’t have a clue what they’re missing. Sounds to me like you need to expand your circle of riding buddies. Pretty narrow minded bunch if ya don’t mind my sayin’ so. If you take their comments too much to heart you’re going to miss a lot of good times on two wheels!

    Variety is the spice of life!


    Iím supposed to respect my elders, but itís getting harder and harder for me to find one now ..

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