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Thread: Fork oil change

  1. #81
    Senior Member Fork oil change
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    I finished this up today for the second time. Much easier this time around and I had purchased the Tusk fork oil tool which was helpful. Does anyone use any grease or anti seize where the forks get clamped? I get some small rust build up here that I buff away. Was just thinking about more protection for the future.
    Last edited by potter0o; 5th October 2019 at 21:05. Reason: word usage

  2. #82
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    Sorry if it sounds silly, I may be missing something, but what happens if you remove only the fork caps, suck out oil with a big syringe and a long tube, and put in an equal amount of new oil?

    I know this skips the spring measurement and goop cleanup, but if I assume no one ever did it on my bike, and I don't want to remove all the forkery just yet, is there any merit in the above method?

  3. #83
    Super Moderator Fork oil change 670cc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaz View Post
    Sorry if it sounds silly, I may be missing something, but what happens if you remove only the fork caps, suck out oil with a big syringe and a long tube, and put in an equal amount of new oil?

    I know this skips the spring measurement and goop cleanup, but if I assume no one ever did it on my bike, and I don't want to remove all the forkery just yet, is there any merit in the above method?
    I think there's merit to doing it this way as a "semi" fork oil change - better than nothing. It will save a LOT of work in not having to remove the forks from the bike, but you will not likely be able to replace all of the oil, just some of it. The key to success would be in accurately measuring and replacing the exact amount of oil removed. If you error, the fork oil level will be low or high, which changes the amount of compressible air in the tube, affecting the "stiffness" of the ride.
    Greg
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  4. #84
    Senior Member Krampus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaz View Post
    Sorry if it sounds silly, I may be missing something, but what happens if you remove only the fork caps, suck out oil with a big syringe and a long tube, and put in an equal amount of new oil?

    I know this skips the spring measurement and goop cleanup, but if I assume no one ever did it on my bike, and I don't want to remove all the forkery just yet, is there any merit in the above method?
    I use a manual vacuum extractor and do exactly what you describe. You should be able to get right about 475ml out with the forks extended (on center stand) of the 515ml that is supposedly in there.

    Remember, only one cap at a time unless you have it on a front stand.

  5. #85
    Senior Member Fork oil change dduelin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaz View Post
    Sorry if it sounds silly, I may be missing something, but what happens if you remove only the fork caps, suck out oil with a big syringe and a long tube, and put in an equal amount of new oil?

    I know this skips the spring measurement and goop cleanup, but if I assume no one ever did it on my bike, and I don't want to remove all the forkery just yet, is there any merit in the above method?
    I'm too meticulous to do an oil change this way but it stands to reason one would get most of the benefit of changing it properly.

    A caveat concerning replacing the fork cap. Some force is needed to press the cap down onto the fork tube combined with a twist to engage the threads without cross-threading them. If you don't have risers the handlebar and cables are kind of in the way of a straight shot at this. I just find this easier to do with the fork tube free and in one hand and the other hand pressing the cap down. It's easier for me to turn the tube onto the cap instead of the cap in to the tube.
    Dave

    GL1800
    NC700XD




  6. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by 670cc View Post
    I think there's merit to doing it this way as a "semi" fork oil change - better than nothing. It will save a LOT of work in not having to remove the forks from the bike, but you will not likely be able to replace all of the oil, just some of it. The key to success would be in accurately measuring and replacing the exact amount of oil removed. If you error, the fork oil level will be low or high, which changes the amount of compressible air in the tube, affecting the "stiffness" of the ride.
    Thanks, looks like I need to get a big pitcher with dials from some cookware store.


    Quote Originally Posted by Krampus View Post
    I use a manual vacuum extractor and do exactly what you describe. You should be able to get right about 475ml out with the forks extended (on center stand) of the 515ml that is supposedly in there.

    Remember, only one cap at a time unless you have it on a front stand.
    Sweet. Which extractor are you using? Which fluid? I thought I could put some weight on the rear while the bike is on the center stand to lift the front up.

    Did you encounter the problem dduelin is describing, turning the cap into the fork when replacing?

    Quote Originally Posted by dduelin View Post
    I'm too meticulous to do an oil change this way but it stands to reason one would get most of the benefit of changing it properly.

    A caveat concerning replacing the fork cap. Some force is needed to press the cap down onto the fork tube combined with a twist to engage the threads without cross-threading them. If you don't have risers the handlebar and cables are kind of in the way of a straight shot at this. I just find this easier to do with the fork tube free and in one hand and the other hand pressing the cap down. It's easier for me to turn the tube onto the cap instead of the cap in to the tube.
    Good to know. I do have a set of 2cm risers with a little tilt off ebay that I didn't install yet.

    Does your SS-47 fluid recommendation still stand?

  7. #87
    Senior Member Therapy's Avatar
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    If/when I take the forks off and drain I think drilling a drain plug would be plan.
    Has anyone done this.
    All my bikes from the past had these.
    Are they not there now to force shop fees? (or new fork/bike sales)

  8. #88
    Super Moderator Fork oil change 670cc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaz View Post
    Sorry if it sounds silly, I may be missing something, but what happens if you remove only the fork caps, suck out oil with a big syringe and a long tube, and put in an equal amount of new oil?

    I know this skips the spring measurement and goop cleanup, but if I assume no one ever did it on my bike, and I don't want to remove all the forkery just yet, is there any merit in the above method?
    One other thought came to mind. If the fork has Racetech Gold Valve Emulators installed, the emulators sit on top of the damper tube and block access to the bottom of the fork. This would severely limit the amount of oil one could extract with a vacuum pump.

    I've easily removed and installed the fork caps many times with the forks mounted on the bike, mainly to adjust the afore mentioned emulators. I also have 2" Rox risers installed. Take weight off the front of the bike so the forks wont compress when spring tension is removed when the cap comes off. Do only one side at a time unless the front end of the bike is fully supported.
    Greg
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  9. #89

  10. #90
    Senior Member Fork oil change dduelin's Avatar
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    As you can see in the original post there is very little required to make a fork oil level tool. An inexpensive syringe and a length of vinyl tubing that is cut to a length that corresponds with the distance down to the desired level. The last item on your selection looks like it would do it. Note that Honda's method of measuring the level requires removing the spring, spacer, and washer but you should be able to do that with a piece of wire bent into a hook.
    Dave

    GL1800
    NC700XD




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