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Thread: Beginner working on 8k service?

  1. #1
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    Beginner working on 8k service?

    As the title states, im a beginner. Like lower level, know nothing beginner. I'd like to learn how to do everything on my bike and since the 8k service is coming in a couple hundred miles, I would like to get started there. Especially because my last time at the shop, I couldve saved about $200 on labor costs (for the $350 i spent at the shop total).

    My question is what do you guys think a beginner can do out of the 8k service checklist? Im pretty sure I can do the oil change, but is everything else just as easy as youtube videos? Also, any advice helps. If theres a toolkit i can buy that has everything i need, or any other suggestions please let me know.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Beginner working on 8k service? 670cc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Landerson31 View Post
    As the title states, im a beginner. Like lower level, know nothing beginner. I'd like to learn how to do everything on my bike and since the 8k service is coming in a couple hundred miles, I would like to get started there. Especially because my last time at the shop, I couldve saved about $200 on labor costs (for the $350 i spent at the shop total).

    My question is what do you guys think a beginner can do out of the 8k service checklist? Im pretty sure I can do the oil change, but is everything else just as easy as youtube videos? Also, any advice helps. If theres a toolkit i can buy that has everything i need, or any other suggestions please let me know.

    Thanks.
    For a total beginner mechanic, the valve check/adjustment would be the most challenging. Depending on the model year of your bike, the manual may not call for a valve adjustment until 16,000 miles (but it couldn’t hurt to do it if you wanted to). Engine oil/filter change, tire pressures, fluid level checks, fastener inspections, brake pad inspections, and chain maintenance are probably doable by anyone with a desire.

    What year is your bike, and is a DCT or manual transmission?

    Saving money is one good thing about doing your own work. Other benefits are that it keeps your bike out of service for less time, the bike is less likely to be damaged (by a dealer), you’ll be more familiar with the bike’s mechanicals in case something goes wrong in the future, and you get personal satisfaction from doing the work yourself.

    We can help you.
    Last edited by 670cc; 30th July 2019 at 14:11.
    Greg
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  3. #3
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    8K Service...........

    Landerson31,

    Depending on where you live, could you look for someone doing the same service on their bike and offer to help them?

    That way you get the benefit of their experience and see what tools you may need if you tackle it on your own.


    Slo_Rider

  4. #4
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    Any basic socket / wrench set should provide you with most all the tools you need to do pretty much anything on the bike besides remove the wheels. Do yourself a favor and go buy a decent socket / wrench set at any big box store like lowes or home depot (harbor freights socket sets are worse than the cheapest stuff lowes and home depot sells. Get one that has all the metric and standard sizes, if possible with 1/4, 3/8, and 1/2 drive sockets. I bought one from Lowes several years ago that had all those sockets, wrenches, short well and deep well sockets, box end wrenches, socket extensions, and screw driver with various bits for less than $100. Think it was Task Force brand, and I have used the crap out of that tool set over the years, sockets have held up well too.

    My general rule of thumb is that if I ever need a tool, even just once, I buy it or a set of whatever "it" is so I will have them if I ever need them again.

    You can do most anything with a set like that, but for the wheel removals, for the front you will need a 17mm allen socket (similar to the picture below) and for the rear I just use a very large thumb wrench to loosen the axle nut. A sturdy large thumb wrench might run you around $30-40 but will be something you will use more than once, plus being long enough to get good leverage to break loose and tighten axle nut.



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  5. #5
    Senior Member Beginner working on 8k service?
    Beginner working on 8k service?
    Red Rider's Avatar
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    Videos are great but it would be helpful to have a Service Manual for your bike as well. We were ALL newbies once. You can learn to do just about anything on this bike if you have the patience and tools for the job.


    Iím supposed to respect my elders, but itís getting harder and harder for me to find one now ..

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    I agree that the factory service manual would be a super good idea.

    The hardest thing about the service will be the valve clearance check. That’s only partly because of accessing the valves (which is relatively easy, as far as motorcycles go). Another challenge is the feel of the feeler gauges, particularly because of the angle on some of them. If you’ve never used feeler gauges, it would be very handy to have someone experienced there with you the first time.

    I’m too cheap to pay a dealer (or anyone) to do most service work on my vehicles, so I do it myself. However, I have the advantage of having been a farmer for the first 30 years of my life, so machines are familiar (even appealing) to me.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Jt105's Avatar
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    Like everyone else said... just do it.
    I was a teen when I started working on my motorcycles. Learned a lot along the way. There is not a whole lot that is rocket science on the NC700X. It is a pretty simple machine.
    Take your time and learn as you go. There are a lot of people on this forum that have done everything on this bike, so you have a living resource online here.

    JT

  8. #8
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    2 good options on tool sets pictured below on Lowes website. The one for $139 is marked down from $199. That's a solid set, even comes with allen wrenches, and Kobalt makes good stuff. That set would last you a long time. There are also other options cheaper, but didn't see any good sets worth buying cheaper than $99. Looked like the cheaper sets had fewer standard wrenches, but plenty sockets and socket wrenches and so on.



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  9. #9
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    All solid advice here so far. As far as tooling is concerned, I have decided not long ago, to purchase whatever tooling I need for the job from the money I would have spent at the mechanic. That way, I learn to sort the bike out myself, acquire the tools and I don't pay over the top amounts to mechanics who half-arse it anyway!

    Sent from my SNE-LX2 using Tapatalk

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karl84 View Post
    All solid advice here so far. As far as tooling is concerned, I have decided not long ago, to purchase whatever tooling I need for the job from the money I would have spent at the mechanic. That way, I learn to sort the bike out myself, acquire the tools and I don't pay over the top amounts to mechanics who half-arse it anyway!

    Sent from my SNE-LX2 using Tapatalk
    As far as YouTube is concerned, I've learned most of what I know from clips by an Australian man. I think his channel is nc700xstuff or something similar. Clear, concise instructions

    Sent from my SNE-LX2 using Tapatalk

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